Musicals: Gifts From The Brits

Fall 8-Week / $170
Mondays September 25 - November 13 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Nancy Harvey
Join us as we study a variety of musicals that come to us from England. We will watch filmed stage versions of The Pirates of Penzance, Stop the World I Want to Get Off, Jekyll and Hyde, and the movie versions of Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1970) and The Boy Friend (1971). As always we'll have a marvelous time listening to (and watching) great music. Maybe we'll sing a little, too! [D, L, V]

Poetry: Writing and Reading

Fall 4-Week 1 / $85
Mondays September 25 - October 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Polly Willard
Our emphasis will be on writing and sharing our own poems. On the first day bring one of your own poems if you have one, and bring a poem by another poet to share. (Bring a copy of each poem for each person in the class.) There will be some discussion of the elements of poetry, subject matter, styles of poetry, creativity, personal expression, art. [W, R, D] (Suggested reading: The Poetry Home Repair Book by Ted Kooser, Bison Books, 2007)

Thomas Hart Benton: Artist & American Regionalist

Fall 4-Week 1 / $85
Mondays September 25 - October 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Tom Mitchell
"I paint what I see." --Thomas Hart Benton We will explore the life, works and techniques of Thomas Hart Benton, Missouri painter, muralist and social observer. We will also look at the American Regionalist movement with which he was associated. Tom was always his own person, and his life had many twists and turns, alternately being in and out of fashion. One of his more famous murals is in the Missouri Capitol building, filling a large lounge room. [L, D, RP]

Great Ideas in Modern Architecture: Pritzker Prize Winners

Fall 4-Week 2 / $85
Mondays October 23 - November 13 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Karen Sterbenz, Nina Kaplan
In this course we will look at winners of the prestigious international prize, which is awarded each year to a living architect/s for a significant achievement and is often referred to as "architecture's Nobel." Class members will be asked to prepare and present reports and lead conversations on the lives and works of individual architects chosen from a list provided by the facilitators. We will not repeat architects covered in the Winter 2015 course. [D, RP]

Reading The Wall Street Journal

Fall 8-Week / $170
Mondays September 25 - November 13 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Greg DiBlasi, Marilyn Lipman
What a great way to start the week-a lively discussion of selected articles from the previous week's WSJ! The articles selected will deal mainly with important economic issues and business. Some stories of related scientific and political interest also will be included. E-mail (for communicating reading assignments) and access to the WSJ are required. Short-term reduced-rate subscriptions will be available to the WSJ. [D, RP, R]

African-American Literature: Nikki Giovanni

Fall 8-Week / $170
Mondays September 25 - November 13 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Brenda Lambert
Nikki Giovanni (b. June 7, 1943) is one of the world's most well-known African-American poets. Giovanni began writing poetry shortly after graduating from Fisk University and has been going strong for the past four decades. She has written poetry about the historical times (including the Civil Rights and Black Arts Movements of the '60's & '70's), social issues and her personal growth and observations (such as the simple pleasure of new snow on her brow). Reading many of her poems is like having a "remember when" conversation with a Baby Boomer friend. Additionally, her free-verse and informal structure make her poetry very approachable; nevertheless, she still challenges the reader's thoughts and assumptions. As Felicia R. Lee of the New York Times writes, "Ms. Giovanni has always said that the personal combines with the political, that her writing - described by critics as blunt and lyrical, with a bluesy quality - talks not just about politics but also about love and longing." Please join us as we assess whether Giovanni's title of "Poet of the People" is well earned. [L, R, D, RP, V] (The Collected Poetry of Nikki Giovanni 1968-1998, Harper Perennial, 2017; a manual of supplemental readings)

The Ancient Greeks and Democracy

Fall 8-Week / $170
Mondays September 25 - November 13 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Peter H. Griffin
This course is a survey of aspects of Greek history from the Mycenaeans to Alexander the Great, with an emphasis on the rise, efflorescence, and fall of democracy. For the Greeks, democracy literally meant rule by the people, and many--especially aristocrats and oligarchs--thought it a very bad thing. We moderns often see today's democracy as a direct descendant of the age of Pericles; it isn't, but the Greek experience may still have some lessons for us. We will read brief excerpts from Greek authors, using them for class discussion of subjects such as individual values and democracy, warfare and national values, ideals of citizenship, relations between the rich and the rest, and the role of demagogues. [L, D] (A manual of supplemental readings)

[Closed] The World in Disarray

Fall 8-Week / $170
Mondays September 25 - November 13 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Ellen Moceri
In this course we will examine the major U.S. foreign policy constructs that have governed our approach to the world from the Congress of Vienna, through World Wars I and II; the impact of the Cold War; and the post-Cold War dilemmas: 1) globalization developing at the same time as populism and regionalism; 2) decreasing poverty developing at the same time as the widening gap between prosperous nations and failed nations. We will examine the diplomacy, strategy, and trade policies of the United States in seven major areas of the world: Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, Middle East, Africa, North America, and South Asia. We will share our interests and various areas of expertise as we respond to the last chapter of Haas' book, "A Country in Disarray," and try to discern the emerging foreign policy constructs that should continue to guide the United States as we assert a positive direction for the world order. [R, D] (A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order by Richard Haas, Penguin Books, 2018)

[Closed] Formation of The Qur'an & Emergence of The Muslim Community

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
James Poag
Many non-Muslims find the Qur'an difficult to comprehend. Any understanding of the work by one unfamiliar with it will be hampered by a number of factors, including the following: (1) the Qur'an's suras (poetic units), composed orally by the Prophet, have been preserved in the written canonical text in an order which reverses the chronology of their original production; (2) unlike the Jewish and Christian scriptures, the Qur'an appears to have virtually no ongoing narrative thread or organizing principle; (3) because the Qur'an has arisen out of cultural-historical conditions and is interpreted according to traditions unfamiliar to us, we will inevitably, if unknowingly, often misread its 'intent.' We will approach the above issues using historical-critical methods, reading selected suras in the actual order of their original production. Context will be provided through extensive commentary in the course booklet. Since the core language of the Qur'an is, like all scripture, analogical (symbolic-mythical), we will also supply literary methods. In doing these things, we will gradually discover the work's underlying structure and significance: it reflects the emergence of a monotheism originally taught as 'one' with Judaism and Christianity, but which the Muhammad gradually came to preach, in part at least, as oppositional and 'superior' to them. We will thus be able to see how Islam gradually developed from an inchoate 'movement' to a separate monotheistic 'institution' with distinctive theology. [L, R, D] (A manual of readings to purchase)

Politics

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Dave Matter, Jay Lapin
Do you like to talk about or listen to discussions regarding the actions, lack of actions, personalities, and policies of the nation's government? If so, then join us on Tuesday mornings for lively discussions and debates on the politics of the day. Our class is devoted to discussion amongst class members as well as guest speakers discussing a timely political topic. Don't hesitate! This class fills quickly, so join us as we take on the politics of our government in a lively and exciting manner. [RP, D, GS]

A Cultural History of France Part VIII: Restoration & Romanticism (1815---30)

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
n/a
Anna DiPalma Amelung
Wednesdays September 27 - November 15 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna DiPalma Amelung
The fall of Napoleon brought back the old Bourbon dynasty-and a much needed period of rest-but it did not solve the deep discontent felt by a large section of the French population. The excitement of the Napoleonic adventure was experienced now with great nostalgia as it clashed with the greed and pettiness of everyday life. "I was born too late in a world too old," wrote the poet Alfred de Musset, thus giving voice to the aspirations of the new Romantic generation and the popular "mal du siècle" (ennui). In this course we will examine the historical background of Romanticism, read excerpts from poets such as Lamartine, Vigny, Musset, and young Hugo, analyze a few pages from Stendhal's novels, listen to the Romantic music of Berlioz, and excerpts from operas by Halévy and Auber, read passages from Hugo's theater as well his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, and analyze the art of Delacroix and Géricault. PLEASE NOTE that there are TWO sections of this course: Section One on Tuesday and Section Two on Wednesday.

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Charlotte Lanham
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Rudy Yanuck
For years you have been promising yourself to write the stories of your life. Now is your opportunity! This 8-week course surrounds you with like-minded writers, all eager to document their journey. Be encouraged as you listen to how others tell their tales. And be prepared to end this class with one of the greatest gifts you can offer to the next generation.your very own, and true, life stories. Class members are encouraged to bring a written five-minute reading per session. Each reading is followed by a gracious critique from your fellow writers. Concise tips on writing your story will be provided at the beginning of each class. [W, R, D]

Early Verdi Operas

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Sol Guber
Families and their interactions are very important in Verdi operas. However, they are as dysfunctional as families are today. Do daughters ever listen to their fathers? Gilda in Rigoletto did not, nor did Louisa in Lucia Miller. Can brothers not fight? They fought in Il trovatore. Do foolish men listen to their fathers? Always, as Alfredo does in La traviata. And what can we say about Lady Macbeth? Join us to watch and discuss these Verdi operas. [A, V, D]

[Closed] The Consolations of Philosophy

Fall 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays September 26 - November 14 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Rob Greitens
This course is based on Alain de Botton's book The Consolations of Philosophy, in which he discusses philosophy's relevance to everyday life and presents the wisdom of some of the greatest thinkers of the ages as advice for our day-to-day struggles. The six "consolations" are: Unpopularity (Socrates); Not Having Enough Money (Epicurus); Frustration (Seneca); Inadequacy (Montaigne); A Broken Heart (Schopenhauer); Difficulties (Nietzsche). The author's goal is to bring ideas back to where they belong: at the center of our lives. [R, D] (The Consolations of Philosophy Alain de Botton, Vintage, 2001)

Reading the New Yorker (SIG)

Fall 8-Week / $170 $25
Tuesdays September 26 - November 17 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Dave Crowley, Jerry Kottler, Karen Sterbenz
Join this energetic and articulate group as we meet weekly to discuss The New Yorker magazine and its articles. We are fortunate to have a multi-million-dollar staff preparing a new curriculum for us each week! We look at last week's issue, discussing in small groups those articles that interest us. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. [D, RP, R]

Reading The Economist (SIG)

Fall 8-Week / $170 $25
Wednesdays September 25 - November 17 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Marilyn Alton, Ron Sandler
Join this energetic and articulate group as we meet weekly to discuss The New Yorker magazine and its articles. We are fortunate to have a multi-million-dollar staff preparing a new curriculum for us each week! We look at last week's issue, discussing in small groups those articles that interest us. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. [D, RP, R]

Reading Tennyson

Fall 4-Week 2 / $85
Wednesdays October 25 - November 15 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Jamie Spencer
We're probably familiar with sayings like "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all" or "In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." But the poet who wrote them spoke also of "nature red in tooth and claw." He's Albert, Lord Tennyson, one of the 19th century's great British poets. In four weeks we'll sample some of his great lyric poems (e.g. "Ulysses" and "The Lotus Eaters") and perhaps glance at this Poet Laureate's "occasional" poems like "The Charge of the Light Brigade." But we'll devote part of each class session to one of his greatest poems, one which Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert particularly loved-"In Memoriam". The 132 stanzas dramatize the stages of the poet's grief over the death of a dear friend, but also manage far vaster things. The poem confronts the theological challenges Darwin was raising about God and man's place in the natural order. [D, R] (Tennyson's Poetry (Norton Critical Edition), 2nd Edition, W.W. Norton & Company, 1999)

America's Favorite Actor: Everyman Tom Hanks

Fall 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays September 27 - November 15 12:45 pm - 3:30 pm
181A
Karen Graflage
Not since James Stewart went to Washington as Mr. Smith has an actor filled the role of Everyman so completely as Tom Hanks. What does the concept of Everyman mean? What qualities are needed to portray the role? We will discuss these questions as we view: A League of Their Own (1992); Philadelphia (1993); The 'Burbs (1989); The Terminal (2004); Big (1988); Charlie Wilson's War (2007); Bridge of Spies (2015); Sully (2016). (Please note: some of these movies are rated R.) [D, V]

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Fall 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays September 27 - November 15 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Ruby Lapin
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a constructive setting. [D, W] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

Christianity and Other World Religions: A Dialogue

Fall 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays September 27 - November 15 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Jeff Carr
Many Christians are convinced that their religion is the only true one. This class will explore both the differences and similarities between some of the world's major religions and Christianity. The goal will be to compare and contrast the teachings of various faiths in an effort to discover what adherents of these religions believe and how Christians can relate to other world religions. Plan to bring an open mind and a willingness to evaluate objectively the teachings of some of the world's major religions compared with the teachings of Christianity. [D, R] (Introducing Theologies of Religions by Paul F. Knitter, Orbis Books, 2002)

Automation and Robots

Fall 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays September 27 - November 15 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
David Brown, Tom Mitchell
Automation and robots are all around us and transforming our society. We will look at what automation, robots and drones are, learn some basics on the technologies involved , and talk about many examples of automation and robots that have already changed our economy and our lives. We will discuss where the future might lie. We will finish with a consideration of the societal issues we now face as a result, including job prospects in various industries. [Please Note: This course is an updated version of the winter 2016 course, with added emphasis on automation, artificial intelligence and current social concerns.] [L, D, V]

Herod The Great: Archeology and History of His Palace-Fortresses

Fall 8-Week / $170
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Larry Perlmutter
We will explore the life and building projects of Herod, controversial King of the Jews, who is regarded as the single greatest builder in the history of the Holy Land. We will start with a brief history of the Hasmoneans leading up to the Herodian period. Three perspectives of Herod will be considered: a) Herod the ruthless tyrant; b) Herod the master builder; and (c) Herod the political genius. Then we will explore the archaeology and history of his most important building projects: the Temple Mount in Jerusalem; the lavish Hellenistic seaside city of Caesarea and its artificial harbor; the nearly-impregnable mountaintop fortress of Masada; and the incredible palace-fortress of Herodium where Herod's tomb was discovered ten years ago. [V, D, L, R]

Detective Fiction

Fall 8-Week / $170
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Louise Lonsbury, Sally Kopman, Silvia Madeo
What a line-up! Join us as we round up the usual (and not so usual suspects) one murder at a time. We will read one book a week starting with, The Dry by Jane Harper, set in Australia; Detective Inspector Huss by Helene Tursten (Sweden); A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny (Canada); Jar City by Arnaldur Indridason (Iceland); A Morbid Taste for Bones by Ellis Peters (England and Wales); A Fine Summer's Day by Charles Todd (Pre -WWI England) and Extraordinary People by Peter May (France). The last week of class will be our book exchange, suggestions for books for next year and a guest speaker. [D, R] (See the bibliography on page 11 for specific editions of each novel.)

The Story of Us: Everything Is Connected - Part IV

Fall 8-Week / $170
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
"If we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe." (John Muir) This is a continuation of the story of how our species, Homo sapiens, has been able to survive, adapt, and rise to a position of planetary dominance that has not been achieved by any other species. In this final part of the course, we will start with the 1960s and end with the present time. We will continue to look at all of our connections to the rest of the world as we learn about how our advancing technology has shaped our societies. The major focus of this part of the course is on the relationship of our economic system to the problems we are currently facing. The challenges of sharing the planet with other species are many, and at times they seem overwhelming. We will learn about visionaries who are facing these challenges with new ideas about how to coexist with each other and with other species. "It is not the strongest species that survives nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change." (Charles Darwin) [R, D, L] (Enough is Enough: Building a Sustainable Economy in a World of Limited Resources by Rob Dietz and Dan O'Neill, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2013)

The Demon-Haunted World

Fall 8-Week / $170
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
"It is not the function of our government to keep the citizen from falling into error: it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error." (U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, 1950) We all recognize that the human brain, while capable of amazing feats, is not always rational. Humans are attracted to the fantastical, and prone to self-deception. That is why we all need a good "Baloney Detector" toolkit to help us sort out Fact from Non-Fact and decrease the likelihood that we will fool ourselves or be misled by others. This toolkit is especially important in today's world where "information" of dubious quality can circulate around the globe in an instant. This rapid spread of facts/non-facts worsens the problems created by monied interests seeking to discredit scientific findings in order to obtain influence over government policy. Some topics we will examine are: human gullibility to the appeals of medical quackery (homeopathy); corporate manipulation and misinformation (the tobacco companies and cancer, the fossil fuel industry and climate change); and, the spread of unwarranted alarmism via our electronic devices (the anti-vaccination movement). Hopefully, we will learn to tell the difference between healthy skepticism and energy-sapping cynicism. [L, D, R] (The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl Sagan, Ballantine Books, 1997)

Islamic Art

Fall 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays September 28 - October 19 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Edie Tashma
In a few decades from the mid-seventh into the eighth centuries, the third Abrahamic religion, Islam, spread from Arabia east through India and west into France. Though ANICONIC (no images of humans or animals allowed) by religious requirement, the Arabs who surged out of Arabia brought with them traditions known to them from Christian, Jewish, Persian and Yemeni merchants. The rules of their religion combined with the tradition of others, but also with the artistic movements of all the lands they conquered, created new expressions in art that have been identified as "Islamic," but have also influenced artistic styles in the West, East, and Africa. In this 4-week preview, let's explore all these elements, particularly the monumental mosques, gloriously decorated books, everyday objects, as well as Persian and Indian miniature paintings that recall stories of history and romance. To do so, we'll visit Spain, France, Northern Africa, Iran, The Middle East, and India without our passports and gain new knowledge of how belief is expressed in art. Join us! [L, D]

The Modern Irish "Ballybeg" Plays By Brian Friel

Fall 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays September 28 - October 19 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Don Godiner
Brian Friel (1929-2015) is one of Ireland's most acclaimed late 20th century playwrights. Many of his plays are set in a small fictional Irish town called Ballybeg. The two plays we will study (Dancing at Lughnasa and Philadelphia, Here I Come!) sympathetically describe the social, historical, cultural, and religious influences impacting and shaping the lives of 20th century Irish families and the family dynamics and communications (or lack thereof) among family members. [L, D, R] (Copies of the plays will be available to purchase in the office.)

The Executive Branch of the U.S. Government

Fall 4-Week 2 / $85
Thursdays October 26 - November 16 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Joe Genoni
This course will examine the Executive Branch of the U.S. government. The power of the Executive Branch is vested in the President of the United States, who also acts as head of state and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. We will look at the constitutional powers of the President, informal powers of the President, constitutional amendments concerning the President, limits on the Presidency, President's White House Staff, Cabinet, Federal Bureaucracy, Congress and the Presidency, court decisions and the Presidency. [L, D, R]

Writing For Ourselves

Fall 8-Week / $170
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Nina Kaplan
Thursdays September 28 - November 16 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
LNGE
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Whether you enjoy writing or have always wanted to write, join this congenial group to explore your interest. No previous experience is necessary. Class members write essays, poetry, fiction, or memoir-sometimes all four in the eight weeks or eight weeks of only one. Write whatever you want and bring it to class to read aloud. Your writing will improve by listening to the writing and the constructive critiques of others. [D, W]

Current Events Crossfire (SIG)

Fall 8-Week / $170 $25
Fridays September 29 - November 17 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Gale Murphy, Tom Hahs
Join Lifelong Learning's version of "Donnybrook" and come to this class armed with your opinions and ready to do battle with, and listen respectfully to, the wrongheaded opinions of others. Each week a different group will act as facilitators by preparing questions and discussion points gathered from the news of that week and the group will take over from there. Once again, be prepared to be caught up in the crossfire by reading and listening to "The Media." [D, RP]

Discussable Documentaries

Fall 8-Week / $170
Fridays September 29 - November 17 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
185B
Marge Williams, Roslyn Wylie
Each week we will watch and discuss a full length documentary film covering current events, social issues, or St. Louis related subjects. The class will be asked to volunteer to present background information for each film. The first two films will be: In The Land of the Head Hunters (a 1914 silent film documentary/drama depicting the Kwakwaka'wakw Indians of British Columbia) and 24/7/365 The Evolution of Emergency Medicine (the story of Emergency medicine and how the founders of this specialty changed the American medical landscape). The class will choose from a list of films for the following weeks. [V, D]

Salon

Fall 8-Week / $170
Fridays September 29 - November 17 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Beth Powell
In a world of instant facts, gathering around conversation and stories can be a relief. If you like to talk, listen, and exchange ideas, join the Salon. We will keep a rolling list of topics that class members suggest-which might include moral dilemmas, the effects of screens, optimism and pessimism, Talmudic questions, or even a poem. Each class will cover at least one topic per hour. If you prefer passive listening, this class is not for you. Sometimes we will discuss in small groups, but usually in a circle. Only two things are off limits: local, national, and global politics, and-except for emergencies-use of any hand-held device during discussion. [D]

Venice: A Cultural History, Part II (1700 - Present)

Fall 8-Week / $170
Fridays September 29 - November 17 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna DiPalma Amelung
The Most Serene Republic of Venice began to decay slowly during the Renaissance, but its glamour did not disappear with her political decline. Quite the opposite: the city became a dazzling center of culture, music, art, and tourism. In this second course we will have a quick look at Venetian history from 1700 to the present, and then concentrate on her artistic and musical heritage. Some of the topics we will cover include Venetian Carnevale, the music and operas of Antonio Vivaldi, the art of Tiepolo, Canaletto and Guardi, the adventures of Casanova, the comedies of Carlo Goldoni, the art of glassmaking, the poetry of Ugo Foscolo, and modern Venice including the contributions of the Italian cinematographer Luchino Visconti (Senso), the German writer Thomas Mann (Death in Venice), and the art collector Peggy Guggenheim. [L, D] (Suggested reading: Thomas Madden, Venice, A New History, pp. 340 - 427)

An Introduction To The Exhibit 'Renaissance And Baroque Prints'

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays October 6 - October 6 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
194
Allison Unruh
This program will investigate the rise of printmaking in Europe in the early fifteenth century. Serialized images began to circulate on an unprecedented scale, extending beyond the confines of palaces or churches to reach new audiences of artists, collectors, and connoisseurs. Highlights include work by major innovators of the medium of printmaking such as Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt van Rijn as well as Daniel Hopfer, Marcantonio Raimondi, and Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Artists were able to elevate the print to an important art form in its own right. A variety of printmaking techniques will be discussed, including woodcuts, engravings, and etchings, complemented by a selection of drawings from the same period. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Table Wisdom

FL Shortcourse / $0
Fridays October 13 - October 13 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
194
Rey Castuciano
Come learn more about Table Wisdom and find about working with this local not-for-profit that pairs older adults and English language learners for conversational English and mentoring sessions by video-chat and in-person meetings. Founded by Rey Castuciano, who came to the U.S. in 1989 as a teenager from the Philippines with his parents and sister, the idea came to him when his father suffered a stroke a few years ago. Castuciano spent months at the nursing home with his father and saw a population of seniors that had a lot to offer, but also suffered from loneliness and social isolation. Winner of an award from the WUSTL Social Entrepreneurship Innovation Competition in 2016. (This program is free to LLI members.)

Winter Opera Season Showcase

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays October 20 - October 20 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Gina Galati
Gina Galati, founder and artistic director of Winter Opera which provides St. Louis with world-class operatic performances during the winter months, will visit us again to talk about its upcoming season which will include Sigmund Romberg's The Student Prince, Les Pecheurs de Perles by Georges Bizet and L'Elisir d'Amore by Gaetano Donizetti. She will bring other professional opera singers from the company and together they will give us a wonderful sneak preview and highlights of things to come this season. Don't miss this annual favorite! (The cost of this program is $10.)

The Science (And Art) of Later Life Creativity

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays October 27 - October 27 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Prof. Brian D. Carpenter, Ph.D
What's more creative? A painting by Pablo Picasso or a casserole by Julia Child? A poem by Walt Whitman or the corny limerick thought up by a nine- year old? This lecture explores the complexities of defining and measuring creativity, the evolution of creativity over the lifespan, and the potential benefits of creative engagement later in life. (The cost of this program is $10.)

The World of Jewish Theatre - Past and Present

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays September 15 - September 15 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
194
Kathleen Sitzer
Jewish Theatre has a very long history going back several centuries, originating with Purim Shpiels which ultimately developed into Yiddish Theatre. That form had a very long and noble history and still exists today, but there is a world of contemporary Jewish Theatre throughout the world, including right here in St. Louis. Kathleen Sitzer, artistic director of The New Jewish Theatre, will review that history and look more closely at our own New Jewish Theatre which just closed its 20th season of theatrical excellence. In addition to the lecture/discussion, we will preview scenes from the opening production of the 21st season, Tuesdays With Morrie, based on the beloved book by Mitch Albom and featuring Ben Nordstrom as Mitch and Jim Anthony as Morrie. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Winter Opera World Premiere of Borgia Infami Preview

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays September 22 - September 22 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
n/a
Gina Galati
Join Gina Galati, Winter Opera General Director, Scott Schoonover, conductor, and Dolores Pesce, Washington University professor of music, as they preview the world premiere of Borgia Infami by Harold Blumenfeld. This epic opera depicts the lives, loves and crimes of the notorious Borgia family through the twists and turns of history. You will learn about the behind the scenes production, the history of the Borgias, and experience a few of the arias before the premiere! (The cost of this program is $10.)

Medical Advances: Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon

FL Shortcourse / $10
Fridays November 3 - November 3 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
n/a
Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon
Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon, the Dr. Robert J. Glaser Distinguished University Professor, is the director of the Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences & Systems. Over the past 20 years, Gordon's work has revolutionized the understanding of the microbes that colonize the human gut. His lab's research has implicated the gut's microbial community as playing a causal role in two of the world's most vexing global health problems - obesity and childhood malnutrition. (The cost of this program is $10.)