The Evolution Of Yiddish

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Arnie Kaplan
An image from 1272 AD contains possibly the first record of Yiddish words written within Hebrew letters, but the language began to form long before that. Harder than predicting the future is reconstructing the past. This course is designed for non-specialists. People who are interested in the history of a language and its connection with its underlying culture will benefit. We will follow the revolutionary arguments of Dovid Katz and compare them to the more traditional views. We will look at how biblical and Talmudic writings and historical linguistics guided him to dispute the more standard description of the birth and growth of the language. We will see how a language, which started primarily as a folk idiom, changed to a vehicle for sophisticated literature, theater, and scholarship. [L, R, V, D] (Words on Fire: The Unfinished Story of Yiddish by Dovid Kotz, Basic Books, 2004)

Art as a Muse

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Valerie Levi
This course will take you on an exciting adventure with photographs, paintings and sculpture to inspire your writing. Each week we will provide three pictures to take home, then in class, we will listen to what the images evoked for you. Learn some art history, flex your writing muscle, and marvel at the amazing imagination of your classmates. All forms of writing are welcome. One week will be a field trip to a museum or gallery

Reading The Wall Street Journal

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Greg DiBlasi, Marilyn Lipman
What a great way to start the week-a lively discussion of selected articles from the previous week's WSJ! The articles selected will deal mainly with important economic issues and business. Some stories of related scientific and political interest also will be included. E-mail (for communicating reading assignments) and access to the WSJ are required. Short-term reduced-rate subscriptions will be available to the WSJ. [D, RP, R]

Musicals: Compare & Contrast

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Nancy Harvey
We will study six musicals that you are probably well acquainted with, but we will look at them in pairs to compare and contrast. First up: Oklahoma and Carousel. Then My Fair Lady and Gigi, followed by Fiddler on the Roof and Flower Drum Song. We'll have a marvelous time listening to (and watching) great music. Maybe we'll sing a little, too! [D, L, V]

African-American Literature: Isabel Wilkerson's "The Warmth of Other Suns"

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Brenda Lambert
This first of a two-part series will be based on Isabel Wilkerson's The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration. Wilkerson was the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. For this book, the author conducted extensive historical, political and economic research and combined it with personal narratives of three actual families as they traveled from various Southern states and then established new lives over four to six decades in Northern and Western states which were more hospitable to African Americans after the Civil War. She has successfully created a literary work of non-fiction which captures in lyrical prose the private struggles of many brave, black migrants who dared to 'risk it all for the fulfillment of their American Dream. As we read Wilkerson's reflective text, we will also attempt to capture examples of the migrants' impact on U.S. culture-the music, the language and other unstoppable social movements that shaped contemporary America. (R, L, A, D, RP) (The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, Vintage reprint, 2011; a class manual of supplemental materials, which will include other authors' points of view about the Great Migration, including how St. Louis and Missouri played a part in the lives of thousands of southern African Americans)

[Closed] American Art 1900--1940

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Polly Willard
We will look at the major styles and directions during a time when America was becoming the creative force in western art. A major shift in American art occurred after exposure to the experimental styles of European art in the Armory Show, New York City in 1913. Influential styles such as fauvism, expressionism, cubism, pure abstraction, surrealism, and others took hold with forward looking artists even if the general art viewing public resisted. Our emphasis will be on painting with some consideration for sculpture and our focus will be on the art works, styles and artists. [L, D, V]

[Closed] Korea (The "Forgotten War") Remembered

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Dan Ellis, Leonard Adreon
Tensions have risen dramatically in recent years between North Korea and the U.S., South Korea and their allies. This ominous situation is rooted in the 1950-1953 Korean War, which ended, not in a peace treaty, but with an armistice. We will explore the serious political mistakes that created two Koreas, the invasion of South Korea by North Korean troops, the UN response and President Truman's decision to commit United States troops to defend the Republic of Korea (ROK). We will review General MacArthur's daring amphibious landing of Marines behind enemy lines at Inchon and the consequent rescue of the defeated ROK forces, as well as his miscalculation, convincing President Truman to approve driving north of the 38th Parallel, which triggered the entrance of China into the war causing massive casualties and extended the killing from November 1950 to July 1953. In addition, we will analyze the current situation looking at the options available to the U.S. seeking to prevent the catastrophe of another Korean War. Leonard Adreon, who experienced the conflict as a Navy Corpsman assigned to the Marines in the mountains around the 38th Parallel, will contribute special insights and observations to the class. [R, L, A, D] (The Korean War by Max Hastings, Simon & Schuster, 1988; Recommended: Hilltop Doc by Leonard Adreon, 2017)

The Life and Music of Edward Elgar

Winter 8-Week / $170
Mondays January 8 - March 5 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Lee Kaufman
Elgar is thought by many to be England's greatest classical composer and his works are widely popular throughout the world. His life was colorful and he lived mostly in the 19th century making him a perfect representative of the romantic period. Leonard Slatkin championed his music while in Saint Louis and that generated the spark that created interest locally. To further this, Sir Andrew Davis has guest conducted the SLSO two of the last three seasons and makes it a point to feature his music. This course will be presented by an Elgarian who is founder, president and currently secretary of the North American branch of The Elgar Society. Be prepared to become more familiar with his music. It will not only enhance your knowledge of the concert repertoire, but also give you an understanding as to why Elgar ranks in the top tier of the great classical composers. (L, D, A)

Beethoven - Battle Of The Bands

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Sol Guber
The first time I played a LP of Beethoven's Symphony #9 was 1966. I enjoyed it so much that I played the complete symphony over again. What could make a second listening even more enjoyable? Another interpretation with a different orchestra playing the work! We will be listening and watching all nine of Beethoven's symphonies. We will play each one twice on the same day, but with a different orchestra and conductor for each work. We will compare and contrast each selection and vote on which one would be easier to dance to. [A, V, D]

20th Century American Poets: Bishop, Collins, Gluck, Millay, and Oliver

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Ben Sandler
These five poets were all well-known, honored, and influential in their own times. They illustrate a 20th Century approach to several important strands of poetic thought: Billy Collins and Mary Oliver for their demanding observations of nature; Louise Gl├╝ck and Edna St. Vincent Millay for their focus on relationships; and Elizabeth Bishop for a style that's a little formal, a little reserved, with agitation pushing up from below. We will read for pleasure and insight. For each poem, our method will be to open up the poem by clarifying obscure or archaic language, then hear the poem for its music, images, ideas and sounds - alliteration, rhythm, rhyme. The focus will be on the poems themselves, not on biographical or cultural contexts. There will be lots of discussion, but no one has to speak unless they want to. [R, D]

Politics

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Dave Matter, Jay Lapin
Do you like to talk about or listen to discussions regarding the actions, lack of actions, personalities, and policies of the nation's government? If so, then join us on Tuesday mornings for lively discussions and debates on the politics of the day. Our class is devoted to discussion amongst class members as well as guest speakers discussing a timely political topic. Don't hesitate! This class fills quickly, so join us as we take on the politics of our government in a lively and exciting manner. [RP, D, GS]

Writing Creative Nonfiction

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Bettye Dew
Creative Nonfiction is a genre that uses building blocks traditionally associated with fiction; i.e., scenes, stories, character development and narrative voice. Works of creative nonfiction can be found on best-seller lists and in newspapers, magazines and other publications. Your goal in this class will be to write in a narrative-based way about real people, events, situations or topics. The first class will be devoted to reading and analyzing short, published examples of the genre. For the other seven sessions, you will write your own creative nonfiction pieces, following prompts that allow a wide range of approaches. Travel, food, nature, sports, work, family, human foibles, profiles of people from private or public life-whatever the subject, you'll be surprised where your memory, reflections and creativity take you. [W, D]

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
LNGE
Charlotte Lanham
For years you have been promising yourself to write the stories of your life. Now is your opportunity! This 8-week course surrounds you with like-minded writers, all eager to document their journey. Be encouraged as you listen to how others tell their tales. And be prepared to end this class with one of the greatest gifts you can offer to the next generation.your very own, and true, life stories. Class members are encouraged to bring a written five-minute reading per session. Each reading is followed by a gracious critique from your fellow writers. Concise tips on writing your story will be provided at the beginning of each class. [W, R, D]

Healthcare In the U.S.: Problems and Solutions

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Harry Estill, Leon McGahee
Why is healthcare in our country much more expensive but less effective than in other industrialized nations? We will read and discuss Elisabeth Rosenthal's very readable book An American Sickness, in which she analyzes the problems and proposes a number of solutions for U.S. healthcare. A Harvard Medical School graduate, she was a New York Times senior reporter on healthcare and is now editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News. There will be occasional short presentations by the facilitators and course members formerly in healthcare. [R, D, RP] (An American Sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal, Penguin Press, 2017)

The Elements - Bringing Life Into The Periodic Table

Winter 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays January 9 - February 27 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Charles Kuhn, Harold Juergen Biangardi
In most science classes a poster of the periodic table hangs on the wall. This class will bring it to life - we will discuss its history, its fascinating structure and its significance for Physics and Chemistry. We will learn about the origin of the elements, how they got their names and how they were discovered. We will hear a trove of interesting stories about the discovery of the elements, their part in human history and influence on many aspects in life. [D, RP, L] (Recommended reading: The Disappearing Spoon by Sam Kean; Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams)

Reading the New Yorker (SIG)

Winter 8-Week / $170 $25
Tuesdays January 9 - March 5 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Dave Crowley, Jerry Kottler, Karen Sterbenz
Join this energetic and articulate group as we meet weekly to discuss The New Yorker magazine and its articles. We are fortunate to have a multi-million-dollar staff preparing a new curriculum for us each week! We look at last week's issue, discussing in small groups those articles that interest us. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. [D, RP, R]

Reading The Economist (SIG)

Winter 8-Week / $170 $25
Wednesdays January 10 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Marilyn Alton, Ronald Sandler
The Economist is an authoritative weekly magazine focusing on international politics and business news and opinion. This group discusses news articles from the magazine with class members giving voluntary reports pertaining to these news events. This course is educational and stimulating, especially for those who want to stay up-to-date with what is happening throughout the world. We have a lot of fun in this class and look forward to welcoming you for this winter session. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. (Subscription to The Economist is available at a reduced rate.) [R, D, RP]

[Closed] Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Michael Nolan, Nancy McKee
Once again, winter term means a gathering of Dickens lovers to read, appreciate, and enjoy together Oliver Twist, one of the best-known and earliest novels penned by Charles Dickens. Perhaps you have seen the musical or movie versions, but they can't compare with the carefully constructed plot and subplots of the novel itself, and the unique characters and descriptions of life in mid-century London. Whether visiting for the first time, or revisiting after many years, please join us in relishing this memorable novel, the eighth consecutive Dickens novel offered at LLI. [D, R] (Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, Penguin Classics, 2003)

Random Topics In Linguistics

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Michael E. Nolan
Linguistics is the scientific study of language. In this course we will delve into topics either not discussed or briefly passed over in previous LLI courses. These topics will include: Do all languages have a common ancestor? How are past languages recovered? What features must be included in a language and which are not necessary? How do children learn a language? How do adults learn a language? In what social contexts do bilingualism and multilingualism emerge? Does language channel thought? What does field work in linguistics look like? What do linguists do when encountering an unknown language? How are languages on the verge of extinction documented? We will watch Teaching Company DVDs featuring John McWhorter in the first hour and have discussions based on our viewing in the second hour. [D, R, V]

Reading Four Memoirs

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Barbara Shute, Karen Sterbenz
We will read and discuss four memoirs: Al Franken's Giant of the Senate; You Will Not Have My Hate by Antoine Leiris; When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi; and Hilltop Doc by Leonard Adreon. In the week following each book discussion, we'll share information about the setting and circumstances of each memoir; i.e., for You Will Not Have My Hate, we will talk about Muslim immigration in Paris, terrorism there, etc. [D, R, RP, GS] (See list of books on page 11.)

Films: Unlikely Duos

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 12:45 pm - 3:30 pm
181A
Karen Graflage
What is the nature of friendship? We will try to answer this question as we follow the characters in these buddy/road trip movies through adventure, comedy and sometimes sorrow as they forge a special friendship. We will watch: Midnight Run (1988), Thelma and Louise (1991), The Odd Couple (1968), Some Like It Hot (1959), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Ishtar (1987), The World of Henry Orient (1964), and It Happened One Night (1934). Please note: Some of these movies are rated R. [D, V]

Shakespeare Through Music

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Stanley Misler
Of all writers Shakespeare has inspired the greatest number and variety of classical music, especially opera. What makes the Shakespeare opus so inspirational to composers? How does music enhance the drama? After an introduction to Shakespeare and why his works lend themselves to musical adaptations, we shall try to discern, through "close listening," how operatic adaptions (Hamlet by Thomas, Romeo and Juliet by Gounod; Otello and Falstaff by Verdi, The Tempest by Ades, Midsummer Night's Dream by Britten) bring new perspectives to the dramas and lead characters. Participants will be expected to be familiar with plot lines through reading of plays or plot summaries (all online), and will receive a detailed PowerPoint handout for each session and a CD of musical excerpts towards the end of course. [L, D, A]

Genetic Mechanisms

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Ben Borowsky
This course is designed to make knowledge of genetic mechanisms accessible to class members who are not trained in science. The text and the presentations will avoid scientific jargon. The technology in this field has advanced to a level that creates ethical questions that society as a whole should answer. New advances will create more issues of this kind. Citizens who understand the technology involved and its potential uses, both desirable and undesirable, can make informed decisions. This course is a repeat of a previous course, updated with new information. [L, D, R, V]

[Closed] Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Winter 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays January 10 - February 28 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Ruby Lapin
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a constructive setting. [D, W] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

[Closed] The Story of Us: Everything is Connected - Part I

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
This is the story of how our species, Homo sapiens, has been able to survive, adapt, and rise to a position of planetary dominance that has not been achieved by any other species. Deep Ecology is a relatively new way to look at life on earth. Using this lens we will see how, without intending to, each generation of humans has created innovations that have resulted in problems for the next generation. Due to the complexity of the problems humans will face in the coming decades, we must learn to use a new kind of thinking which integrates scientific, economic, philosophical, and cultural perspectives. In part one of this course we will travel from the Big Bang to the Neolithic Revolution. Yes, we have to begin at the Big Bang, since we need to understand that we are all made of stardust. [L, D] (The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years by Robert M. Hazen, Penguin Books

[Closed] Medieval Western Warfare, 350--1300 CE

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Bill von Glahn
This course will be the first in a two-part series dedicated to an examination of medieval western warfare. These two courses will critically evaluate the gradual disintegration of the Roman Empire and its replacement by an evolving set of successor states that eventually became modern Europe and the Middle-Eastern states. The entire process continues to the present day and has involved a great deal of violent warfare. We will start with the barbarian invasions and continue through the rise of the successor states and the expansion of the Byzantium Empire, the spread of Islam, the Viking assaults, the Norman Conquest of England, the Crusades, and the Mongolian Invasion of Eastern Europe. [L, D, R, V] (Recommended text: Medieval Warfare A History by Maurice Keen, Oxford University Press, 1999)

[Closed] Conflict And Tension In the Middle East: What Are The U.S. Options?

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Sam Grant
The United States faces multiple challenges throughout the Middle East. Civil wars in Syria, Yemen and Libya, ISIS, the war against the Taliban in Afghanistan continue while increasingly authoritarian regimes dominate the scene. These and other conflicts and areas of tension will be examined in this course. Finally, an attempt will be made to determine the soundest strategy for the U.S. to follow in response to each of these challenges. [L, D]

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Rudy Yanuck
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a helpful and constructive setting. [W, D, RP] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

The Persistence of Japanese Architecture

Winter 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays January 11 - February 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Bill Wischmeyer
What is it about the traditional Japanese buildings and gardens that resonates with designers throughout the world? With the history of Japan as a context, we will take a look at the sources, evolution and influence of this culture's aesthetic traditions. From temples to tea houses to megastructures, from prehistory to Tadao Ando, common ideas and values persist. Discover the threads that tie ancient Japan to St. Louis. Lots of lovely slides and no homework-- should be fun! [This course is a repeat.] [L, D]

Saving Your Life: Being a Medical Advocate For Yourself Or Your Family

Winter 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays January 11 - February 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Jeannette Altman
Do you know how to advocate for yourself and for your family members in today's complicated medical and insurance systems? In this course we will learn how to communicate with doctors, hospitals, nurses, and insurance companies. We will explore available resources in our community and learn how to utilize them. In-class exercises will include role-playing in a doctor's office, hospital and emergency room. [L, D]

Writing For Ourselves

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Nina Kaplan
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
LNGE
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Whether you enjoy writing or have always wanted to write, join this congenial group to explore your interest. No previous experience is necessary. Class members write essays, poetry, fiction, or memoir-sometimes all four in the eight weeks or eight weeks of only one. Write whatever you want and bring it to class to read aloud. Your writing will improve by listening to the writing and the constructive critiques of others. [D, W]

Pilgrimage Churches

Winter 4-Week 2 / $85
Thursdays February 8 - March 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Edie Tashma
Have you ever travelled "over the river and through the woods to Grandmother's house"? Then you have made a pilgrimage. The pilgrimage by humans to specific locales is a physical and spiritual journey that seems to have existed since the dawn of man. In this four-week program, we'll go on Christian pilgrimages, such as the pilgrimage route from Notre Dame in Paris to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. These journeys were not only religious, but also critical to the development of Europe. The emphasis will be upon the Romanesque churches built to house the pilgrims along the routes. [L, D]

Kurt Vonnegut: So It Goes

Winter 8-Week / $170
Thursdays January 11 - March 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Tom Tobben
One of the most popular, original and prolific literary novelists of the past 60-plus years, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. left us a rich body of novels, short stories, essays, and drama. This course will explore three of Vonnegut's best novels written over several decades, including discussion of how his personal life experiences and real world events helped shape his fiction. This course is intended to be highly interactive, discussing and analyzing in depth three of his novels, their historical, biographical and thematic context, Vonnegut's distinctive literary style, and our own personal perspectives. Optional material will be provided for those who are interested. [L, D, R, RP, V] (Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut, Dell, 1998; Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Dial Press, 1999; Jailbird by Kurt Vonnegut, Dial Press, 1999)

Science Fiction Films -- Survival

Winter 8-Week / $170
Fridays January 12 - March 2 9:45 am - 12:30 pm
185B
Al Sher, Howard Denenholz
The science fiction film genre has long served as a useful vehicle for "safely" discussing controversial topical issues and often providing thoughtful social commentary on potential unforeseen future developments. Presentation of issues that are difficult or disturbing can be made more acceptable when they are explored in a future setting or on a different, earth-like world. Most controversial topics in science fiction films tend to fall into two general story lines: utopian or dystopian. Either a society will become better or worse in the future. This session will cover a variety of such themes: worldwide attack or plague, climate disaster, and dangers of runaway technology, among others. Films: Independence Day (1996), Mad Max, Fury Road (2015), Planet of the Apes (1968), Terminator (1984), Inception (2010), Jupiter Ascending (2015), Passengers (2016), Ex Machina (2014) [V, D]

Animals In Trouble: Zoos To The Rescue

Winter 8-Week / $170
Fridays January 12 - March 2 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
As the human population continues to grow, some animals, like rats and cockroaches, have learned how to adapt to our presence, but many others, like the big cats, are having great difficulty in co-existing with humans. As a result, many species are currently on the brink of extinction. In this class, we will learn how zoos are coming to the rescue of endangered species. The St. Louis Zoo, currently rated number one in the U.S., is doing important work to promote the conservation of several endangered species and actively works to educate the zoo-going public about the problems animals are facing. [L, D] (Sailing with Noah: Stories from the World of Zoos by Jeffrey P. Bonner, the CEO of the St. Louis Zoo, University of Missouri Press, 2006)

Current Events Crossfire (SIG)

Winter 8-Week / $170 $25
Fridays January 12 - March 5 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Gale Murphy, Tom Hahs
Join Lifelong Learning's version of "Donnybrook" and come to this class armed with your opinions and ready to do battle with, and listen respectfully to, the wrongheaded opinions of others. Each week a different group will act as facilitators by preparing questions and discussion points gathered from the news of that week and the group will take over from there. Once again, be prepared to be caught up in the crossfire by reading and listening to "The Media." [D, RP]

Creative Strategies for Estate, Tax and Philanthropic Planning

WI Shortcourse / $0
Fridays January 26 - January 26 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Larry Katzenstein, Mark Weinrich
Take a fresh look at estate and gift planning that examines ways to maximize your philanthropic support, minimize income, capital gain and estate taxes, and benefit family and loved ones. Attorney Larry Katzenstein, AB '69, partner with Thompson Coburn LLP, will present creative strategies and discuss timely opportunities to help you achieve your philanthropic, tax and estate planning goals. Larry will be joined by Mark Weinrich, Associate Vice Chancellor of Planned Giving at Washington University. (This program is free to LLI members.)

Medical Advances: Dr. Samuel Achilefu

WI Shortcourse / $10
Fridays February 2 - February 2 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Steve Radinsky
An inventor holding 56 U.S. patents, Dr. Achilefu, the Michel M. Ter-Pogossian Professorship in Radiology, has been published in more than 300 scientific papers. His discoveries and inventions include a "universal" cancer-targeting drug for selective detection and treatment of tumors, and a wearable goggle device helping surgeons better see cancer. Among other titles and duties, Dr. Achilefu serves as chief of the Optical Radiology Laboratory at Mallinckrodt and is director of the university's new Center for Multiple Myeloma Nanotherapy. (The cost of this program is $10.)

A Psychoanalyst In The Courtroom

WI Shortcourse / $10
Fridays February 9 - February 9 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Moissy Shopper, M.D.
Dr. Moissy Shopper, Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics and Child Psychiatry, Saint Louis University School of Medicine and faculty member, St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute, will share his experiences as a consultant in child abuse cases, divorce and custody issues, police interrogation and false confessions, and as an expert witness at murder trials over a long and interesting career. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Missouri Puppies For Parole

WI Shortcourse / $10
Fridays February 23 - February 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
George Lombardi, Judy Finnegan
Under Director Lombardi's leadership, the Missouri Department of Corrections established a last-chance training program for rescue dogs deemed unadoptable. The program's success is widely recognized and replicated in the U.S. and abroad. Lombardi and Judy Finnegan, former Director of the Children's office for the Dept. of Mental Health and V.P. of COMTREA, will share the story of the success of this restorative justice program wherein dogs are paired with offenders who give them love and affection while teaching them basic commands. (The cost of this program is $10.)