The Play's The Thing

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Have you always wished you could write a play? Here's your chance! In order to more fully appreciate the structure of a play, we will each create our own drama over the eight-week period of the course, focusing on setting, plot, conflict, character, and dialogue. Our text is Naked Playwriting by award-winning playwrights William Missouri Downs and Robin Russin. [W, R, D] (Naked Playwriting by William Missouri Downs and Robin Russin, Silman-James Press)

Reading the Wall Street Journal

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Greg DiBlasi, Marilyn Lipman
What a great way to start the week-a lively discussion of selected articles from the previous week's WSJ! The articles selected will deal mainly with important economic issues and business. Some stories of related scientific and political interest also will be included. E-mail (for communicating reading assignments) and access to the WSJ are required. Short-term reduced rate subscriptions are available to the WSJ. [D, RP, V]

Musicals: A Preview Of The Muny Opera's Centennial Season

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Nancy Harvey
Join us as we view filmed versions of the musicals which will be featured in the Muny's 100th season. These will include two Tony award-winning Best Musicals: Jersey Boys and Jerome Robbins' Broadway. Then we'll see two great family classics: Annie and The Wiz, followed by two great American musical classics, Gypsy and Singin' in the Rain. Finally, we'll watch a show dear to the hearts of many St. Louisans, Meet Me in St. Louis. [V, L]

The Life And Times of Winston Churchill - Part 1

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Chuck Korr, Dan Ellis
Winston Churchill was a towering figure in the first half of the twentieth century. He was born at the height of the British Empire and lived to regret its dissolution. He was a soldier, journalist, author, painter, politician and statesman. During the course of his tumultuous political career, he held 12 national offices, some of them (e.g. First Lord of the Admiralty, Prime Minister) more than once. This course, which we expect to run for two terms, explores Churchill's complex character and multifaceted career. Born the son of an aristocratic father whom he idealized and an American heiress whom he adored, he experienced a troubled youth. His father would not support his attending University. He had to take the entrance exam for Sandhurst Military Academy three times before barely passing. He spent five years in the British army, often combining his duty assignments with contracts to produce articles for English newspapers. These frequently provided the bases for subsequent books. In his lifetime Churchill published more than forty books in sixty volumes, as well as hundreds of articles. Churchill is best remembered for his leadership in WWII (and to a lesser extent the Cold War). We plan to leave that important dimension of his life for part II, to be considered in a subsequent term. [L, D, V, R]

A Peek Into The Realm of Algorithms

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
David Brown
Algorithms are pervasive in today's world. While the concept is not new, (e.g., a recipe for baking a cake is an algorithm), our digital world is shaped by algorithms of which we may not even be aware. The application of algorithms can even improve non-technical activities in daily life. This course will examine various algorithms answering the questions - What do they do? How do they work? Why do we use them? We will examine several algorithms at a level understandable to people without a technical background (knowledge of mathematics or computer science is not required), although the material will be technical in nature. The course will study algorithms such as sorting and searching, evaluating arithmetic expressions, databases, encryption and when to stop searching; it will end with examining the technology that makes Google work. [L, D, R]

African-American Literature: "The Warmth of Other Suns", Part II

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Brenda Lambert
This is the second half of a two-part series. If you missed part I, you can easily participate in this class, because there will be abbreviated recaps and updates to fill in any gaps. We will continue to follow the lives of the three migrants highlighted in our text by Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns. Did they succeed in their desire to find a place in the sun, did they dance in the sun, and what legacies did they (and the other 6 million migrants) leave for us? Additionally, we will supplement the information in the text with other authors' points of view about the cultural, historical and economic impacts to the United States due to the Great Migrations, which occurred 1910 - 1970. Each week there will be reading assignments and class discussions. There may also be individual class reports. [R, D, L, V, RP] (The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, Vintage reprint, 2011; a class manual of supplemental materials, which will include other authors' points of view about the Great Migration, including how St. Louis and Missouri played a part in the lives of thousands of southern African-Americans)

Writing Poetry

Spring 8-Week / $170
Mondays April 2 - May 21 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Polly Willard
This class will provide an opportunity for us to express our memories, dreams, thoughts and experiences in poems. We will look for inspiration in poems of others and in the various forms of poetry. Each week everyone will bring a poem they have written to share and discuss. The intention of discussion will be to encourage the poet in their expression and writing. On the first day, bring something you have written. Thereafter, we will discuss some idea or image that may be helpful to suggest a poem for the next week. [W, R] (Suggested reading: The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser)

Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

SP Shortcourse / $85
Mondays April 23 - May 21 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Joan McDonald, Sandra Christie
This year the Shakespeare Festival St. Louis will present Romeo and Juliet and once again we will preview and discuss this wonderful play with the assistance of SFSTL directors, actors, musicians, lighting and stage directors, etc. Join us in the discussion of the play-written early in Shakespeare's career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families-and in an inside view of how the production comes together. Attendance at the April 6 performance of Romeo and Juliet by the Shakespeare Festival STL Touring Company is included in this course. [D, R, GS] (Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Folger Shakespeare Library, Simon & Schuster, 2005)

50 Operas - 8 Days

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Sol Guber
Wagner called them "bloody chunks"-when pieces were taken from his operas. However, arias, overtures and other selections have always been really popular with the public. So we are going on a bus tour of the greatest hits of the opera world. First stop on our expedition will be Mozart's Vienna. Then come the Italian city states for Rossini, Donizetti, and Bellini. We will visit Wagner at Weimar and then back south to Italy for Verdi and Puccini. Going north, we will sample Russian-Slavic operas. The world of French opera with all of its exotic locals beckons us. One last detour to fin de siècle Vienna, before we put the water wheels on the bus, returning to America. [A, V, D]

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Charlotte Lanham
For years you have been promising yourself to write the stories of your life. Now is your opportunity! This 8-week course surrounds you with like-minded writers, all eager to document their journey. Be encouraged as you listen to how others tell their tales. And be prepared to end this class with one of the greatest gifts you can offer to the next generation.your very own, and true, life stories. Class members are encouraged to bring a written five-minute reading per session. Each reading is followed by a gracious critique from your fellow writers. Concise tips on writing your story will be provided at the beginning of each class. [W, R, D]

A Cultural History of France Part IX: Romanticism To Realism, 1830-40

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
n/a
Anna Amelung
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna Amelung
The revolution of 1830 brought in a new king, Louis-Philippe, and great hopes for a more liberal monarchy. France was looking forward and developing into the most culturally advanced country in Europe, while at the same time looking back with nostalgia at the First Empire: the ghost of Napoleon was omnipresent. In this course we will explore the most important artistic, musical, operatic, theatrical, choreographic, and literary achievements of this decade: we will read pages from the works of Honoré de Balzac, George Sand, Alfred de Musset, Victor Hugo, and Stendhal. We will listen to the music of Chopin and Listz, and enjoy two operas by two Jewish composers, Giacomo Meyerbeer's Robert le Diable, and Fromental Halévy's The Jewess. In theater we will explore two plays: Musset's Lorenzaccio and Hugo's Le roi s'amuse (Rigoletto), and we will also watch scenes from a lovely Romantic ballet, La Sylphide. We will end the course with a panorama of the visual arts up to 1840. So much beauty in this crucial decade! [L, R] (Recommended text: The Seven Ages of Paris by Alistair Horne, Vintage Books, 2004, pp. 159-208) PLEASE NOTE that there are TWO sections of this course: Section One on Tuesday in Room A/B and Section Two on Wednesday in Room 194.

Politics

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Dave Matter, Jay Lapin
Do you like to talk about or listen to discussions regarding the actions, lack of actions, personalities and policies of our local, state and federal governments? If so, then join us on Tuesday mornings for lively discussions and debates on the politics of the day. Our class is devoted to discussion amongst class members as well as guest speakers discussing a timely political topic. Don't hesitate! This class fills quickly, so join us as we take on the politics of our governments in a lively and exciting manner. [RP, D, GS]

Reading The Gospels Through Jewish Eyes

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
185B
Sheldon Enger
The gospels are the narrative of the early Christian movement's accounts of the public life of Jesus, his messages, activities and death. The gospels, which were written 40 to 80 years following the death of Jesus, are a combination of remembered history and metaphorical history. We will study the known history of Judea during the first century to gain an understanding of its impact on the development of Christianity as well as the narratives contained in the gospels, the Jewish scriptures, and traditions which are the foundation for many of the historical metaphors contained in the gospels. We will try to differentiate between the Jesus we meet on the pages of the New Testament that emerges from the biblical cannon and the historical Jesus. This course is a repeat. [L, R] (A manual of selected readings from both the New Testament and the Hebrew Bible will be required for this class.)

All You Need To Know About Weather And Climate

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Marlene Katz
"Don't knock the weather; nine tenths of the people couldn't start a conversation if it didn't change once in a while." (K. Hubbard) From blizzards to hurricanes, humans have always been both affected by and fascinated with weather. You will learn how to "read the clouds" and also about how advances in our technical devices have allowed us to be better predictors of weather events. In addition, we will briefly review the histories of the sciences of weather (meteorology) and climate (climatology) and learn that, although they are closely related, they are very different things. Confusion about these two muddies our conversations and slows our collective response to the serious problems humans will face as temperatures rise. [L, D, R] (Weather 101: From Doppler Radar and long range forecasts to the polar vortex and climate change: Everything you need to know about the study of weather by Kathleen Sears, Adams Media, 2017)

The Sixties - Part 1

Spring 8-Week / $170
Tuesdays April 3 - May 22 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Ed Fullerton
Welcome to the Sixties, a decade we all experienced. Our study will include a political, economic, social, and cultural survey and analysis of the decade. Part I will mainly focus on the years 1960 - 64 but the organization will not be strictly chronological. Resources for the class will include the CNN Sixties and other videos, a booklet of readings and information, discussion, and reports by members of the class. Those considering signing up for the course should be aware that I facilitated a course on Lyndon Johnson in 2010 and that there will inevitably be some duplication of the information in that class. Part II will be offered in the spring of 2019. [L, D]

Reading the New Yorker (SIG)

Spring 8-Week / $170 $25
Tuesdays April 3 - May 25 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Dave Crowley, Jerry Kottler, Karen Sterbenz
Join this energetic and articulate group as we meet weekly to discuss The New Yorker magazine and its articles. We are fortunate to have a multi-million-dollar staff preparing a new curriculum for us each week! We look at last week's issue, discussing in small groups those articles that interest us. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. [D, RP, R]

Reading The Economist (SIG)

Spring 8-Week / $170 $25
Wednesdays April 4 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Marilyn Alton, Ron Sandler
The Economist is an authoritative weekly magazine focusing on international politics and business news and opinion. This group discusses news articles from the magazine with class members giving voluntary reports pertaining to these news events. This course is educational and stimulating, especially for those who want to stay up-to-date with what is happening throughout the world. We have a lot of fun in this class and look forward to welcoming you for this spring session. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. (Subscription to The Economist is available at a reduced rate.) [R, D, RP]

Two Strong Women From G.B. Shaw: Major Barbara & Mrs. Warren

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Wednesdays April 4 - April 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Jamie Spencer
In this four-week course, we'll take a close look at two of George Bernard Shaw's most powerful heroines-modern women for a century ago and still remarkable today. Mrs. Warren's Profession and Major Barbara give us a chance to see how revolutionary Shaw was in both his choice of subject matter and in the impressive women he makes his main characters. Mrs. Warren makes what might seem the rather shocking case for prostitution: it was one of the few avenues to economic security available to women of that time. In Barbara Undershaft he explores, in his typically iconoclastic and witty fashion, the roles of the Salvation Army, of religion in general, and of the British munitions industry as shapers of the Victorian and Edwardian world. [R, D] (George Bernard Shaw's Plays (Norton Critical Edition), W.W. Norton & Co., 2002)

The Best Short Stories Of 2017

Spring 4-Week 2 / $85
Wednesdays May 2 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Barbara Shute, Karen Sterbenz
Using the book Best American Short Stories of 2017, we will read and discuss four of the chosen stories each week. Four author reports will be presented in each session, as well as class discussion. The Best American Short Stories series has been published since 1917. This year's series is edited by author Meg Wolitzer and continuing editor, Heidi Pitlor. This course has been offered in previous years, using different editions of this popular series. [R, D] (The Best American Short Stories of 2017, Meg Wolitzer and Heidi Pitlor, editors, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017)

What Makes A Good Society?

Spring 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Leon McGahee, Liz Zelman
What would a good society look like? In this course, we will explore this, using an evolutionary framework to pose and discuss questions about ourselves, the world we live in, and the values we hold. Last year Thomas Friedman compared the acceleration of global changes to a tornado passing through a trailer park. Can we thrive in the midst of this turbulence? How can we use our talents for long-term thinking and planning, given our human tendency to deal with the immediate and push aside unpleasant knowledge that is not yet acutely painful? Using presentations, readings, short videos, and discussion, we will discuss ways and means toward a more sustainable, user-friendly society (a society for people!) [L, D, V] (Building the New American Economy: Smart, Fair, and Sustainable by Jeffrey Sachs, Columbia University Press, 2017)

Wednesday Afternoon At The Movies: Classic Teams From The Movies

Spring 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 12:45 pm - 3:30 pm
181A
Karen Graflage
Some artists have such an affinity for each other that they work together many times over their careers. We will look at four such teams and discuss why these pairs work so well together and continue to appeal to audiences. Merchant & Ivory: A Room with a View (1985), The Remains of the Day (1993); Tracy & Hepburn: Adam's Rib (1949), Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967); Hitchcock & Grant: Suspicion (1941), North by Northwest (1959); Wes Anderson & Bill Murray: Moonrise Kingdom (2012), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001). Please note: one of these films is rated R. [D, V]

Colors - Exploring The Art, Technology And Culture Of Colors

Spring 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Tom Mitchell
What is color? We will explore the role of colors in art, culture and technology, including fashion, everyday life, and language. We will start will a short introduction to the physics of color and the neuroscience of vision needed to appreciate the main material. Come and share your own perceptions, reactions and insights to the visuals that will be presented. There will be modest repetition from the four-week course Spring, 2017. [L, D, V]

The Roots of Swing: How The Jazz Age Of The 1920s Transformed America's Music

Spring 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Dr. Henry L. Ettman
Explore the bands, soloists and jazz scenes of the 1920s and the ways they transformed ragtime, blues and vaudeville into the music of the swing era and today's "concert jazz." Archival audio/video presentations will help illuminate influences such as prohibition, the mob, race and the Great Migration, urbanization and technology on the great music of the period. We will delve into the major entertainment hubs of Chicago, New York, Kansas City and beyond, and immerse ourselves in music by artists such as Louis Armstrong, Jimmy Noone, Bix Beiderbecke, Isham Jones, Fletcher Henderson, and Paul Whiteman. This course will view jazz history in the broader social environment of the period, and touches on such related areas as prohibition and organized crime, race, urban and national politics, changing moral standards, technology and the arts, etc. No formal musical background is necessary, but come prepared for lively discussion and after-class get-togethers and meet-ups to listen to live jazz in our city. [L, D, V]

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Spring 8-Week / $170
Wednesdays April 4 - May 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Ruby Lapin
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a constructive setting. [D, W] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

The Story of Us: Everything is Connected - Part II

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
"Homo sapiens is the species that invents symbols in which to invest passion and authority, then forgets that symbols are inventions." (Joyce Carol Oates) In this course we will continue learning about our place on this earth and how we are connected to everything else. We will learn how our species, Homo sapiens, was able to rise to the top of the food chain and how our ancestors began to spread all over the planet. The cognitive revolution that enabled us to develop language led to many other abilities, including the most important one for our success as a species - the ability to work cooperatively towards a common goal. We will examine the social structure in which our species lived for 95% of its existence - the tribe - and think about the implications of modern humans having retained a deep need for belonging in a world that values independence and self-sufficiency. "Our need to belong is not rational, but it is a constant that exists across all people in all cultures." (Simon Simek) [L, D, R] (Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger, Twelve, 2016)

Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Rudy Yanuck
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a helpful and constructive setting. [W, D, RP] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

Eight Great Plays

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Barbara Matthews, Gary Cope, Sally Kopman
In this class we will discuss one play each week from our assigned reading list with the ultimate goal of having provocative discourse and an exchange of ideas emanating from some of the best and award-winning contemporary dramatic literature. Our plays will include 1) Lynn Nottage's 2017 Pulitzer winner Sweat, a "powerful and compassionate song of blue collar despair"; 2) Ayad Akhtar, award-winning playwright of Disgraced now gives us Junk, a play that "crunches the social, political and economic data of this greedy new world."; 3) Good People by David Lindsay Abaire, a humorous and touching tale of a not-so-humorous socio-economic struggle; 4) Between Riverside and Crazy, Stephen Andy Guirgis' Pulitzer award winning play "located somewhere south of cozy and north of dangerous, west of sitcom and due east of tragedy"; 5) The Humans by Stephen Karam, a "celebration of working class familial imperfection and affection"; 6) Sonia Flew, by Melinda Lopez, a play about family, flight, forgiveness, and cultural identity; 7) Henry David Hwang of M Butterfly fame gives us the very funny but poignant Yellow Face; 8) Paula Vogel's 2017 Tony Award-winner Indecent, a testament to the power of theatre! [R, D, L, V] (Copies of the plays will be available before classes start.)

Medieval Eastern European Warfare

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays April 5 - April 26 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Bill von Glahn
This a companion to last term's course on warfare in the western half of the Roman Empire and will cover the period 376 A.D. (Battle of Adrianople) to 1453 (Fall of Constantinople), dealing with the collapse of the Roman Empire to the extent it occurred in the eastern half. We will consider the efforts of Justinian to reverse the collapse of the western portion of the Empire, which efforts enjoyed brief, partial, albeit unsustainable success. The immediate successors to Justinian were unable to hold the gains, but these failures were in turn reversed by Heraclitus. Thereafter the Byzantium Empire experienced occasional successes followed by losses. Ultimately it was weakened to such an extent that it was unable to hold off the 100,000 forces of the Ottoman Empire. These forces, employing cannon against the formerly impregnable walls of Constantinople, eventually defeated the city's 7,000 defenders. With the city's fall the Byzantium Empire collapsed, putting a final end to the Roman Empire. Having taken Part I is not a requirement for taking Part II. [L, D, V]

George Caleb Bingham, His Life, Art And Times

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Thursdays April 5 - April 26 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Tom Mitchell
George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) was a janitor; cabinet maker; painter of portraits, politics and the Missouri River; a Missouri State Representative, State Treasurer, General, and Professor of Art; forgotten and rediscovered. We will study his life, his art works including major ones at the St. Louis Art Museum, and how he was influenced by and illuminated his times. We will see major works at the St. Louis Art Museum for one session. [L, D, V, FT]

Footsteps Of Humanity: Pilgrimage In The Non-Western World

Spring 4-Week 2 / $85
Thursdays May 3 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Edie Tashma
In this four-week program we will visit pilgrimage sites in the non-western world, such as Mecca, the holiest city in Islam, Borobudur (Buddhist) on the island of Java, and the Ganges River (Hindu), considered sacred as the terrestrial home of the goddess Ganga. We will also explore an interesting example of cultural, non-religious pilgrimage-the journey called the Grand Tour, popular from the 17th century to the present. Once more particular emphasis will be given to the art and architecture. Let's also share our own examples of pilgrimage! Part II is independent of Pilgrimage I which centered around Christian Pilgrimage. Leave your passports at home and join us. [L, D, V]

Writing For Ourselves

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Nina Kaplan
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
LNGE
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Whether you enjoy writing or have always wanted to write, join this congenial group to explore your interest. No previous experience is necessary. Class members write essays, poetry, fiction, or memoir-sometimes all four in the eight weeks or eight weeks of only one. Write whatever you want and bring it to class to read aloud. Your writing will improve by listening to the writing and the constructive critiques of others. [D, W]

Two Comedies Of Shakespeare: Taming Of The Shrew & A Midsummer Night's Dream

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Jim Poag, Rob Gibson
While engaging in close textual analysis, this course will explore Shakespearean comedy both as a literary genre and as a particular way of looking at human existence. We will give special attention to the nature of the above two works as theater, doing selected readings from the plays. A class booklet with secondary materials will also be used. After our own critical work has been completed, we will view DVDs of actual productions. The staging of the Shrew will be a traditional version from the Globe Theater in London, that of the Dream a more experimental one done in NY by Julie Taymor (of Lion King fame). We will seek to understand the interpretive goals of the two stagings and the relative success of each in reaching their ends. This course is to be followed by others dealing with Shakespearean comedy so that we may gradually gain a historical overview of the genre's development. Each of our meetings will be two and a half hours rather than the usual two. [L, D, V] (The Taming of the Shrew, Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004 and A Midsummer Night's Dream, Folger Shakespeare Library, 2004)

Science Snippets XIII

Spring 8-Week / $170
Thursdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Bob Bauman, David Brown
This is the thirteenth "Science Snippets" course featuring eight guest speakers (one a week), most of whom are LLI members, who will speak on a different topic each week. Margaret Johnson, Tom Mitchell, Rich Heuermann, Claude Bernard, Hannah Zane, Dan Steinmeyer, Greg Kohler, and Josiah Lewis will speak on topics ranging from bird migration to the science of presolar grains (particles in space). The presenters will use various audiovisuals, show-and-tell, etc. to explain their material. [L, D, V]

The History Of The South 1865--1965

Spring 8-Week / $170
Fridays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Charles Schneider
We will review and discuss a part of our nation's history in a region that has often been fundamentally different from other regions of the United States. This course will begin with the aftermath of the Civil War, its radical effect on the region, the nation's involvement with the South's reconstruction, it's successes and failures, the power and racial struggles that would deeply mark the South for the hundred-year period of this course. Phases will include: defeat and liberation, Reconstruction (presidential & congressional), The Redeemers, the rise of "Jim Crow" and the New South, and finally the origins of the protest movements (bus boycotts, march on Selma etc.) to end legal segregation that would come to be called the Civil Rights Movement up to 1965 (L, D,V.) A review of books to further our knowledge of these times will be discussed in class.

The Birth Of Italian Cinematography: Silent Cinema And The Arts

Spring 8-Week / $170
Fridays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna Amelung
In 1911 the Italian film critic Ricciotto Canudo, in his manifesto The Birth of the Sixth Art, argued that cinema's main goal is to synthesize the five other arts: painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and poetry. Cinema must be "a superb conciliation of the Rhythms of Space (the Plastic Arts) and the Rhythms of Time (Music and Poetry)." Later Canudo added another art, dance: cinema thus became known as the "seventh art." This course will explore the birth of Italian cinematography as the most artistic in Europe before World War I. Our goal is to analyze scenes from silent movies and find the artistic sources which inspired them. Among the movies we will view are Nero, The Odyssey, Dante's Inferno (excerpts from the poems will be read), The Last Days of Pompeii, Cabiria (a major influence on D. W. Griffith's Intolerance), and Assunta Spina. We will also analyze the phenomenon of the "diva," the first animation, and end with Futuristic films. We will also stress the political ramifications of Italian cinematography such as colonialism, the birth of the Nietzschean Übermensch (the "Superman" Maciste), and the advent of Fascism. [L, V, D]

Current Events Crossfire (SIG)

Spring 8-Week / $170 $25
Fridays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Gale Murphy, Tom Hahs
Join Lifelong Learning's version of "Donnybrook" and come to this class armed with your opinions and ready to do battle with, and listen respectfully to, the wrongheaded opinions of others. Each week a different group will act as facilitators by preparing questions and discussion points gathered from the news of that week and the group will take over from there. Once again, be prepared to be caught up in the crossfire by reading and listening to "The Media." [D, RP]

The Cutting Edge Of Research: Dr. Eric Herzog

SP Shortcourse / $10
Fridays April 20 - April 20 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Steve Radinsky
Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Biology, and Co-Director, Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Dr. Eric Herzog examines the ways in which our daily schedules can influence our health. Chronotype, or biological time for waking and sleeping, can be disrupted by work, ambient lighting and other factors. Chronodisruption is prevalent in all societies where people change their schedules on free days compared to work or school days. Dr. Herzog's research focuses on how to avoid chronodisruption, and how to treat its consequences. His work is conducted at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels in mice and in people. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Navigating The Cancer Journey: Insights From A Psychologist And Husband

SP Shortcourse / $10
Fridays May 11 - May 11 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Dr. Kenneth Haugk
When Dr. Kenneth Haugk's wife, Joan, was diagnosed with cancer, their family's world was turned upside down. What followed was an unfamiliar, difficult journey. As a result of that experience and research with over 3,500 cancer survivors, loved ones, and medical professionals, Dr. Haugk wrote Cancer-Now What? Taking Action, Finding Hope, and Navigating the Journey Ahead, a guidebook designed to help those with cancer and their loved ones meet the medical, emotional, relational, and spiritual challenges they often face. Join Dr. Haugk, who holds his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Washington University, for a special presentation as he shares from his personal experience and extensive research about the challenges those with cancer face and offers practical ways to address those challenges. Following the presentation, there will be a time for questions and answers and a book signing. (Copies of the book will be available to purchase.) Those currently dealing with cancer, those who want to care for people they know with cancer, and others who are interested in learning more about this subject are welcome. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Romeo And Juliet Performed By The Shakespeare Festival St. Louis Touring Company

SP Shortcourse / $10
Fridays April 6 - April 6 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
n/a
St. Louis Touring Company
Join us for the one-hour version of Romeo and Juliet! Despite their families' mutual hatred, young Romeo Montague and Juliet Capulet innocently fall in love. Torn between familial loyalty and their passion for each other, these "star-crossed" lovers devise a tragic plan, ultimately forcing the reconciliation of their feuding families. (The cost of this program is $10.)