"New" Musicals

Spring 8-Week / $165
Mondays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Nancy Harvey
Join us as we view some "new" musicals with which you may not be acquainted! Two of these are Broadway adaptations of movies (Billy Elliot (2014), Victor Victoria (1995) and two are movie versions of Broadway musicals (Annie (2014), Rent (2005). The Last Five Years (2014), written by Tony award-winning composer and lyricist Jason Robert Brown, is a musical deconstruction of a love affair and marriage taking place over a five-year period told almost entirely through songs. As always we'll have a marvelous time listening to great music and watching great movies. Maybe we'll sing a little, too! [D, L, V]

Turning Life Into Fiction

Spring 8-Week / $165
Mondays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
LNGE
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Using exercises from the book Turning Life into Fiction, we will explore converting real life into great stories. Robin Hemley covers a wide range of subjects in his book: recording and generating ideas from daily life; using true anecdotes, real places, and real people. Whether you would like to get started using what you already know to make great stories or you want to tweak your writing skills, this course is for you. [W, R, D]

The Story of Writing Part III

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Mondays April 3 - April 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Michael E. Nolan
We will continue to explore the origins and development of writing throughout its 5,500-year history as viewed through the lenses of archaeology and linguistics. This term we look at the Mycenean, Mayan and Aztec civilizations and also speculate on the future of the written word. This course is the third of three parts. Each class will consist of watching an hour-long DVD, followed by class discussion. Students will be expected to read class handouts. [L, D, V, R]

The Eastern Roots of American Transcendentalism

SP Shortcourse / $85
Mondays May 1 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Doug Twells, Rob Gibson
Ralph Waldo Emerson played an outsized role in conceiving and describing the set of principles and ideas that is commonly labeled Transcendentalism. He was a prolific and highly influential essayist, poet, lecturer, and a leading intellectual light in early 19th century America. He directly influenced Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and many others. In shaping his ideas, Emerson read extensively in sources of Eastern and Mid-Eastern philosophy, religion, and literature at a time when attention to these sources was rare in the United States. He discovered much that he found compelling. We will examine the concept of Transcendentalism, primarily through Emerson's work, and read brief excerpts from some of his Eastern sources which include Indian, Persian, Early Christian, Chinese, and Neo-Platonic texts. We also will read representative works of American writers who have been inspired by Emerson and Transcendentalism, and consider how some of these ideas continue to resonate in American literature up to and including the period of the Beat Poets of the 1950s and 1960s. No preliminary reading is necessary, but those with some exposure to Ralph Waldo Emerson may bring valuable knowledge to class discussion. [L, D, V, R, GS, FT] (Manual of readings to purchase)

Reading the Wall Street Journal

Spring 8-Week / $165
Mondays April 3 - May 22 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Greg DeBlasi, Marilyn Lipman
What a great way to start the week-a lively discussion of selected articles from the previous week's WSJ! The articles selected will deal mainly with important economic issues and business. Some stories of related scientific and political interest also will be included. E-mail (for communicating reading assignments) and access to the WSJ are required. Short-term reduced-rate subscriptions will be available to the WSJ. [D, RP, R]

[Closed] Immigration In a Nutshell

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
[Closed] Mondays April 3 - April 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Gene McNary
Immigration--the international movement of people into a destination country of which they are not natives or where they do not possess citizenship-is a hot topic these days. In this course we will learn about and discuss the basics: immigration visas, non-immigration visas, refugees and asylum, diversity visas, exclusion-deportation, homeland security, immigration courts, the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution, and current reform measures. [L, D, GS]

Business Cycles

SP Shortcourse / $85
Mondays May 1 - May 22 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Harry Estill
Industrial economies have expanded and contracted for hundreds of years. There have been marvelous periods of growing economic activity with prosperity and optimism. And there have been tough times with shrinking economic activity and growing unemployment. Even though irregular in timing and size, these sequences have been called "business cycles," noted for their downturns. Each class member is asked to research and report briefly on one downturn from a list to be provided. First is the famous 1636 Dutch tulip bubble and last the 2007 United States subprime loan recession. Through reports and discussions, we will try to identify causes of the downturns and effectiveness of the corrective actions taken. [L, D, RP]

Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale

SP Shortcourse / $85
Mondays April 3 - May 1 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Joan McDonald, Mike Nolan
This year the Shakespeare Festival St. Louis will present The Winter's Tale and once again we will preview and discuss this wonderful play with the assistance of SFSTL directors, actors, musicians, lighting and stage directors, etc. Considered either as a comedy or a romance, The Winter's Tale contains his most famous and challenging stage direction: 'Exit, pursued by a bear'. Join us in discussion of the play, and an inside view of how the production comes together. [D, R, GS] (The Winter's Tale by William Shakespeare, Folger Shakespeare Library, Simon & Schuster, 2005)

African-American Literature: Toni Morrison

Spring 8-Week / $165
Mondays April 3 - May 22 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Brenda Lambert, Cindy Turner-Johnson
If you like to read stories and solve puzzles, please join us for a reading adventure as we investigate the novels Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye written by award-winning author Toni Morrison. (She received both the Pulitzer and Nobel prizes for fiction and literature.) An examination of Morrison's life and how she skillfully weaves African-American music, folk tales, and even a hero's journey into her works will be explored. To assist class discussion, video clips, PowerPoint slides and handouts will supplement the texts. To aid in our investigation of Song of Solomon, we will review civil rights individuals and events, as well as characters from mythology and the Bible. The Bluest Eye will be studied for its semi-autobiographical elements and its use of interior monologue. Come prepared for lively class discussions and a few fun, in-class exercises. [R, A, D, V, RP] (Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison, Vintage International, 2004; The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, Vintage International 2007)

Politics

Spring 8-Week / $165
Tuesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Dave Matter, Jay Lapin
Do you like to talk about or listen to discussions regarding the actions, lack of actions, personalities, and policies of the nation's government? If so, then join us on Tuesday mornings for lively discussions and debates on the politics of the day. Our class is devoted to discussion amongst class members as well as guest speakers discussing a timely political topic. Don't hesitate! This class fills quickly, so join us as we take on the politics of our government in a lively and exciting manner. [RP, D, GS]

Russian Opera - Part 1

Spring 8-Week / $165
Tuesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Sol Guber
Opera is propaganda. When Mother Russia needed a specifically Russian version of propaganda due to its very low literacy rate, it turned to opera. (Other versions of propaganda were difficult to understand due to its very low literacy rate.) Thus operas were regularly used as a method of teaching history, as well as reinforcing the power of the Tsar. The operas that we will see are: Glinka's Ruslan and Ludmila, Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, Borodin's Prince Igor, Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, and Rimsky-Korsakov's Le Coq d'Or. We will watch wonderful productions and, as always, there will be subtitles! [A, V, D]

'Art of Belief' & The Life of Emily Dickinson (1863-1886) Part III

Spring 8-Week / $165
Tuesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
James Poag
The clear and momentous fact is that Emily Dickinson definitely drew back from any final commitment to formal religion. One critic cites the similarities he finds between Dickinson's attitudes and those of Herman Melville, namely that accepting Christianity "has come to represent passivity, surrender and mediocrity." This stubbornness on her part suggests, moreover, that the poet equates religious conversion with marriage, and that both signal-in her mind-"the subordination of self to another." Dickinson's attitude toward conversion may reflect her dislike of what she calls "Amherst's society." By choosing not to convert to Amherst's conventions, including its religious ones, she was avoiding the town's emotional tenuousness, its cultural isolation, and its heavy uniformity of manner, sensibility and opinion. In her writing, she makes it clear that "society's majority" comes near to having the power of life and death over "the spirit." Dickinson resists that tyranny. This eight-week course concludes our three-part study of the poet. [R, D] (Manual of readings to purchase)

[Closed] Writing Your Spiritual Journey

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Tuesdays April 4 - May 23 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Charlotte A. Lanham
Born a Baptist? Converted to Catholicism? Happy with your Jewish heritage? Considering atheism? This memoir class is an excellent opportunity for you to share your short- or long-term spiritual journey with your fellow writers, friends and family. Recall lessons learned in childhood. Preserve the wise advice passed on through your parents or other saintly mentors. Share your most sincere or amusing commentaries. Nothing preachy.just true and simple stories from the heart. This could be your greatest gift to the next generation! Class members are encouraged to bring a written five-minute reading per session. Each is followed by a gracious critique from your fellow writers. Concise tips on "writing your spiritual memoir" will be provided at the beginning of each class. [W, R]

[Closed] A Cultural History of France Part VII: Napoleon I (1795-1815)

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Tuesdays April 4 - May 26 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
n/a
Anna DiPalma Amelung
[Closed] Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna DiPalma Amelung
"I am the Revolution!" said a young man from Corsica, and he changed the course of history. His name? Napoleone Buonaparte. Against all odds, he conquered the largest European empire since ancient times and left his imprint all over the globe. This course will offer an overview of the Napoleonic era, which took Europe by surprise with its worldwide ramifications and revolutionary ideas. We will thus explore the history, culture, literature, music, theater, and the arts of these twenty years. In order to give a more complete view of this period, several video clips from famous Napoleonic movies will be used, and excerpts from operas by young Gioacchino Rossini and Gaspare Spontini will be played. This survey of Napoleonic times will include the art and fashion of the First Empire, its elegant architecture, as well as many political cartoons and literary passages. [L, R] (Recommended text: The Seven Ages of Paris by Alistair Horne, Vintage Books, 2004, pp. 159-208) PLEASE NOTE that there are TWO sections of this course: Section One on Tuesday and Section Two on Wednesday. *The last class of this session will meet on Friday, May 26 from 1:00-3:00 p.m. due to room availability.

Art: Design in Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Tuesdays April 4 - April 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Polly Willard
This short course will look at three art forms: painting, sculpture and architecture. It will be organized into four parts so as to look at one art form in each class. Day one: two-dimensional painting; day two: three-dimensional painting; day three: sculpture; and day four: architecture. Each class will begin with ancient and end with modern art. Emphasis will be first on the design and meaning of each artwork, second on the artist (if known), and third on the time in which the artwork was created. Nude images will be shown. [L, D]

[Closed] Art, Architecture & Politics In The Dutch Golden Age

Spring 4-Week 2 / $85
[Closed] Tuesdays May 2 - May 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Katherine Deschryver
This class will present an overview of art from the Dutch Republic (17th century), a time when their science, trade, and art were top ranked in the world. The Dutch Revolt of 1579 severed the formerly conjoined 17 provinces into the largely Catholic regions of Flanders, unwillingly, but remained under the control of the Spanish Habsburgs, and the predominantly Protestant Dutch Republic, which fought for political and religious independence for almost 80 years. Dutch art and architecture in cities like Amsterdam, Delft, and Haarlem developed a distinctive character. Secular painting such as landscape, still life, and "scenes of everyday life" had great appeal, and the relatively wide distribution of wealth in the Dutch Republic led to more people of different social levels buying art on an unprecedented scale. We will review some of the well known painters such as Vermeer, Rembrandt, Rubens, and Frans Hals, as well as lesser known ones like Clara Peeters. Lace for men's fashion, music, and tulip mania will also be discussion topics. [L, D]

Reading the New Yorker

SP Shortcourse / $165 $25
Tuesdays April 4 - June 27 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
185B
Dave Crowley, Jerry Kottler, Karen Sterbenz
Join this energetic and articulate group as we meet weekly to discuss The New Yorker magazine and its articles. We are fortunate to have a multi-million dollar staff preparing a new curriculum for us each week! We look at last week's issue, discussing in small groups those articles that interest us. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. [D, RP, R]

Reading the Economist (SIG)

SP Shortcourse / $165 $25
Wednesdays April 5 - June 28 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Marilyn Alton, Ronald Sandler
The Economist is an authoritative weekly magazine focusing on international politics and business news and opinion. This group discusses news articles from the magazine with class members giving voluntary reports pertaining to these news events. This course is educational and stimulating, especially for those who want to stay up-to-date with what is happening throughout the world. We have a lot of fun in this class and look forward to welcoming you for this winter session. We do not stop because the term ends, but continue in between. (Subscription to The Economist is available at a reduced rate.) [R, D, RP]

[Closed] The Parallel Development of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
181A
Peter Van Horne, Sheldon Enger
The late professor Huston Smith, who was a professor of philosophy at Washington University in the 1950-60s, stated in his classic text, The Worlds Religions, "understanding can lead to love, so we must learn to listen to put into play the compassion that all of the wisdom traditions enjoin, for it is not possible to love another without hearing the other." In this course we will discuss the common roots that both Christianity and Rabbinic (contemporary) Judaism share. We will examine the interpretation of biblical scripture and historic events of the first 400 years of the common era that became the foundation of Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism that led to a "parting of the ways." We will also assess events in our lifetime that may have given new meaning to a "Judeo-Christian" tradition. [L, D]

Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children

Spring 8-Week / $165
Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Nancy McKee, Sue Clancy
This course will introduce us to Salman Rushdie, one of the 20th century's greatest story tellers, and to his award-winning novel, Midnight's Children. Thirty-five years after receiving the Booker Award, Midnight's Children still stands as a "must read" post-colonial classic. It is the story of Saleem Sinai, born at the stroke of midnight, August 15, 1947, the exact moment of India's independence from British rule. Set in India and Pakistan and merging fact and fiction, Rushdie tells the story of Saleem's and of India's birth and coming of age. Intertwined and often inseparable, both are filled with hope as well as despair. Join us in acquainting ourselves with Salman Rushdie, his beloved India with its complex tensions between Hindu and Muslim faiths, and his cast of unforgettable characters. [L, D, R, GS] (Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie, Random House, 25th anniversary edition)

100 Years Of The Best American Short Stories

Spring 8-Week / $165
Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Brenda Lambert, Karen Sterbenz
The Best American Short Stories (BASS) is the longest-running and best-selling series of short fiction in the United States. Many writers received their first national recognition as "must-read writers" from BASS. Using the book 100 Years of The Best American Stories, we'll discuss four short stories each week. (You will have the option of reading all four of those assigned or only two.) Class members will make reports on authors and historical events over the years. Then we will break into small discussion groups each hour to discuss the stories and to come up with questions we all can discuss. The stories are great and the discussion will be lively! As we read the selections, we will see why this publication continues to thrive. [R, D, RP] (100 Years of The Best American Short Stories, Lorrie Moore and Heidi Pitlor, editors, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015 [L, D]

[Closed] Harry S. Truman

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Ed Fullerton
Harry S. Truman is now frequently ranked among the top 10 American presidents. Many taking the class will remember Truman and the course will cover him from his early life through his life after his presidency. Our study of Truman's foreign policy will emphasize the Cold War including the Truman Doctrine, containment, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Airlift, NATO, nuclear weapons, and more. Aspects of the ending of World War II and of the Korean War will be highlighted with neither war studied in detail. Domestically, postwar problems and issues, the election of 1948, the Fair Deal, internal security, civil rights, and immigration are among the topics to be surveyed and analyzed. To conclude our study, we will look at how the public and historians have viewed Truman and his presidency over the years within the larger context of changing presidential rankings and the reasons behind the change. [L, R, RP, D, V] (Manual of readings to purchase)

[Closed] Memoirs: Writing Life Stories

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Ruby Lapin
[Closed] Thursdays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
186C
Lois Atnip, Rudy Yanuck
Have you ever wished to write stories from your life experiences/observations to share with immediate family, extended family, friends, or the general public? These may be stories of what you've done, what you've learned, people you've met, places you've lived, places where you've traveled. A memoir may be a collection of "single slices" of your life: childhood, career, retirement, war duty, living in another culture, etc. Or it may be a chronological accounting of your entire life. Class members act as a sounding board for our writings, giving feedback in a constructive setting. [D, W] (Writing Your Life, Mary Borg, Cottonwood Press, 1998)

Films: Wednesday Afternoon At The Movies: The Art Of The Caper

Spring 8-Week / $165
Wednesdays April 5 - May 24 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm
181A
Karen Graflage
Isn't it fun to be baffled? Join in the fascination of a well thought-out caper that develops a problem or two and may or may not resolve them. We will view eight classic gems: How to Steal Million (1966), original versions of The Italian Job (1969) and Ocean's Eleven (1960), The Hot Rock (1972), Topkapi (1964), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Sting (1973), and Murder on the Orient Express (1974). Please note: Not one of these films is rated R! [D, V]

The Story of Us: Everything Is Connected - Part III

Spring 8-Week / $165
Thursdays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Marlene Katz
The disadvantage of men not knowing the past is that they do not know the present. (G. K. Chesterton) This is the third part of the story of how our species, Homo sapiens, has been able to survive, adapt, and rise to a position of planetary dominance that has not been achieved by any other species. Deep Ecology is a relatively new way to look at life on earth. Using this lens, we will see how, without intending to, each generation of humans have created innovations that have resulted in problems for the next generation. Due to the complexity of the problems humans will face in the coming decades we must learn to use a new kind of thinking which integrates scientific, economic, philosophical, and cultural perspectives. In part one of this course we traveled from the Big Bang up to Homo Sapiens. In part two we began with hunter-gatherer societies and their transition to agriculture and end up at the dawn of the Industrial revolution. In part three of this course we will travel from the Industrial Revolution to the 1950s. [L, D] (Text: TBD)

Eight Great Plays

Spring 8-Week / $165
Thursdays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Barbara Matthews, Gary Cope, Sally Kopman
In this class we will discuss one play each week from our assigned reading list with the ultimate goal of having provocative discourse and an exchange of ideas emanating from some of the masterpieces of dramatic literature. Our plays will range from the birth of modern drama to contemporary Pulitzer- and Tony Award-winning plays. Weekly reading, in this order, will include Tom Stoppard's hysterical Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Alan Bennett's provocative The History Boys, Chekov's classic character study The Cherry Orchard, Peter Schaffer's brilliant Amadeus, Nagle Jackson's delightful farce Opera Comique, David Henry Hwang's study of betrayal M Butterfly, David Marguiles' Pulitzer Prize-winning Dinner with Friends. Last but not least, Macky's back in town, as we end with Brecht's timeless classic, The Threepenny Opera. [R, D, L, V]

Yiddish Theater

Spring 8-Week / $165
Thursdays April 6 - May 25 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Arnie Kaplan
The roots of Yiddish theater are in the dramas of the Old Testament. It was born during the middle ages nurtured by the Enlightenment, and grew in spite of the anti-semitism of the 19th and 20th century. When the Jews immigrated to the United States, so did the Yiddish theater with all the extravagant insane people that were part of it. During the early 20th century it blossomed on the Lower East Side of New York. Parts of it were incorporated into the Broadway theater. After it served its purpose, it dwindled. This course will use film and music to introduce you to Boris Thomashefsky, Molly Picon, Jacob Adler and many others. We will witness giant egos, oversized libidos, cut-throat competition, adulterous liaisons, and hilarious wrangles. [L, D, A] (Vagabond Stars: A World History of Yiddish Theater, Nahma Sandrow, Syracuse University Press, 1996)

[Closed] Four Moliere Plays

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Thursdays April 6 - May 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Don Godiner
We will spend eight weeks reading portions of and discussing Richard Wilbur's excellent and very humorous English verse translations of four of Moliere's world-renowned satirical comedies. This will allow us to enjoy the special pleasure of reading these important French satires as translated into skillful and entertaining English verse by one of America's acclaimed and witty modern poets who has served as U.S. Poet Laureate. The four plays are: "Tartuffe," "The Misanthrope," "The School for Wives," and "The Learned Ladies." [L, D, V] (The Misanthrope and Tartuffe by Moliere, tr. Richard Wilbur, Mariner Books, 1991; and The School for Wives and The Learned Ladies by Moliere, tr. Richard Wilbur, Harvest Books, 1991)

[Closed] Exploring Thomas Jefferson: "Will The Real Mr. Jefferson Please Stand Up?"

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Thursdays April 6 - May 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
181A
Bos Irvine, John Dwyer, Kathy Irvine
Thomas Jefferson is widely recognized as a highly intelligent, complex, and often perplexing politician and leader of the nation in its first years. We will explore certain aspects of his character, reputation and accomplishments. The man we are most familiar with was an idealistic visionary, best known for his drafting of the Declaration of Independence. We may know also some of his other writings such as the Summary View of the Rights of British America, the book-length Notes on the State of Virginia, and the Virginia Statute of Religious Liberty. He served as the new nation's ambassador to France, as our first secretary of state, and as the third president of the United States, serving two terms. As president, he carried out the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. In retirement, he was a driving force behind the founding of the University of Virginia. Jefferson was also man of many contradictions. He was a lifelong critic of the institution of slavery while himself being one of the largest slaveholders in the state of Virginia. An outspoken opponent of the mixing of the races, he is thought to have carried on an extended sexual relationship with one of his female slaves, having children by her and maintaining them in bondage throughout his life. An advocate for the "yeoman farmer," he was himself an extravagant spendthrift and was mired deeply in debt throughout his life. Thinking himself an unselfish nonpartisan leader, he was considered by many of his contemporaries to be the most divisive figure in the early Republic. We will explore in this course some of these episodes, conflicts, and paradoxes, seeking to gain a broader and deeper understanding of the man, and an appreciation of the complexity of his character. [L, R, D, RP, A] (American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson, Joseph J. Ellis, A.A. Knopf, 1998)

Science Snippets XII

Spring 8-Week / $165
Thursdays April 6 - May 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
194
Bob Bauman
This is the twelfth "Science Snippets" course featuring eight guest speakers (one a week), most of whom are LLI members. Don Snyder, Tom Mitchell, Liz Zelman, Don Schnellmann, Hannah Zane, Dan Steinmeyer, Arnie Kaplan, and Leon McGahee will speak on topics ranging from climate change to the science of psychoactive drugs. The presenters will use various audiovisuals, show-and-tell, etc. to explain their material. [L, D, V]

[Closed] Writing For Ourselves

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Thursdays April 6 - May 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
186C
Leonard Adreon, Nina Kaplan
[Closed] Thursdays April 6 - May 25 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
LNGE
Dennis Smith, Karen Sterbenz
Whether you enjoy writing or have always wanted to write, join this congenial group to explore your interest. No previous experience is necessary. Class members write essays, poetry, fiction, or memoir-sometimes all four in the eight weeks or eight weeks of only one. Write whatever you want and bring it to class to read aloud. Your writing will improve by listening to the writing and the constructive critiques of others. [D, W]

Current Events Crossfire (SIG)

SP Shortcourse / $165 $25
Fridays April 7 - July 7 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
181A
Gale Murphy, Tom Hahs
Join Lifelong Learning's version of "Donnybrook" and come to this class armed with your opinions and ready to do battle with, and listen respectfully to, the wrongheaded opinions of others. Each week a diferent group will act as facilitators by preparing questions and discussion points gathered from the news of that week and the group will take over from there. Once again, be prepared to be caught up in the crossfire by reading and listening to "The Media".

[Closed] Venice: A Cultural History: Part I (Founding to 1700)

Spring 8-Week / $165
[Closed] Fridays April 7 - May 26 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
194
Anna DiPalma Amelung
Venice. The very name conjures up images of romantic canals and gondolas, stately palazzos reflecting in the lagoon, glassmaking and. hordes of tourists! The "Serenissima" was a republic for 1,300 years, the seat of a dazzling culture which dominated the Mediterranean, and imposed itself on the rest of the world. We will begin by exploring the history, culture, art, architecture, literature, and music of Venice from its founding to 1700. Topics to be presented are the incredible voyages of Marco Polo, enterprising Venetian Renaissance women such as the poet Gaspara Stampa, the art of Titian, Giorgione, and Carpaccio, the operas of Claudio Monteverdi, the establishment of the Jewish ghetto, and revolutionary historical figures such as Giordano Bruno and Paolo Sarpi. [L, R, D] (Suggested reading: Venice: A New History, Thomas F. Madden, Penguin Books, 2012)

Colors: Exploring The Science, Technology and Culture of Colors

Spring 4-Week 1 / $85
Fridays April 7 - April 28 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Tom Mitchell
What is color? How is color constructed in the brain? How do we formulate the colors of objects and scenes? We will explore the physics, neuroscience and technology of the colors we perceive. We will then explore the roles of colors in art, fashion, everyday life, language, and culture. Come and share your own perceptions, reactions and insights to the visuals that will be presented. [L, D]

[Closed] The Science of Music and The Music of Science

Spring 4-Week 2 / $85
[Closed] Fridays May 5 - May 26 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
185B
Michael Montague, PhD.
This course aims to explore the underlying science and mathematics of music itself, as well as the biology, psychology, and anthropology of music perception, performance, and composition. In addition, participants will explore the inspiration that music has brought to contemporary cosmology and to the efforts of physicists to understand the fundamental nature of reality, including string theory and quantum mechanics. [L, D, V]

[Closed] Ageism: Society's Prejudices Toward Aging and Its Impact on Self-Perception

SP Shortcourse / $10
[Closed] Fridays April 28 - April 28 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
185B
Gloria C. Gordon, PhD, Nina Kaplan
We have all heard a great deal about sexism and racism, but most people in our society have not heard the word "ageism" and may not realize that ageism exists. In our society we treat people with different levels of respect and appreciation according to their age. In this workshop we will focus on the age oppression that targets older adults and talk about the burden of self-stereotypes that we carry within us. We will also discuss the Age Liberation Movement and signs of social change in this country, specifically the Village movement and baby boomers. (The cost of this program is $10.)

Medical Advances: The Cutting Edge of Research

SP Shortcourse / $10
Fridays April 28 - April 28 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
n/a
Steve Radinsky
Learn about the cutting edge of medical research that is rapidly transforming the way we treat deadly diseases from an expert at the WUSTL School of Medicine. Matheus Victor, a PhD candidate in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at the Washington University School of Medicine, will speak on his research, "Modeling Huntington's Disease with Neurons Reprogrammed from Patient Skin Cells." (The cost of this program is $10.) Room A/B of the West Campus Conference Center

Julius Caesar Performed By The Shakespeare Festival St. Louis Touring Company

SP Shortcourse / $10
Fridays April 7 - April 7 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
n/a
[TBA]
Join us for the one-hour version of Julius Caesar! In the ancient Roman Republic, Julius Caesar's growing power and popularity with the common citizens cause great distress among other politicians, notably Brutus and Cassius, who conspire with fellow Romans to assassinate Caesar. But how will this weigh upon the conspirators, and how will Caesar's friend Mark Antony react? The virtues of heroes are tested, alliances are fragile, and superstitious prophecies spell doom for all of Rome as "the dogs of war" are unleashed. (The cost of this program is $10.) Room A/B of the West Campus Conference Center

A Guided Tour of The Exhibit: "Spectacle and Leisure in Paris: From Degas to Picasso"

SP Shortcourse / $10
[Closed] Fridays April 14 - April 14 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
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Allison Taylor
Fridays April 14 - April 14 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
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Allison Taylor
Allison Taylor, Head of Education, will take us through this special program highlighting France, its culture and art, as well as its modernity. Bringing together a broad selection of prints, posters, photographs, and film, this exhibition offers an overview of the thriving entertainment cultures of Paris in the last decades of the nineteenth century. Some of the artists featured include Pierre Bonnard, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Pablo Picasso, as they depict life in the boulevards, the speed of the racetrack, and the performance worlds of the café-concert, ballet, opera, and the theater. (The cost of this program is $10.) Mildred Lane Kemper Museum, Washington University