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48 courses found.
JEWISH, ISLAMIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES (L75)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)SP2017

L75 JINE 1550Temple & Palace in World History: Approaches to Religion and Politics in the Middle East3.0 Units
Description:This course aims to examine the ways in which temple and palace cooperated with and competed against each other in the Middle East from ancient to the present times. As sites of spiritual and political power, temples and palaces have played a major role in human history. They have been a source of cooperation and conflict by inspiring and regulating the spiritual and social lives of people, including how they enacted laws, developed cultures, established institutions, and interacted with each other as individuals, families, and societies. We will trace how their interactions produced various models of authority, law, and social association and how they collectively and separately rationalized social hierarchy and diversity in human societies, including the notions of equality, justice, hierarchy, morality, meritocracy, status, coercion and persuasion, gender, and class in various contexts. We will begin our examination from the 'city-states' of ancient Mesopotamia and move on to study the empires of the Islamicate Middle East, including the Caliphate, the Selçuk, Mamluk, Safavid, and Ottoman Empires. We will conclude the semester with a comparative overview of this enduring theme in world history to shed some light on our own experiences today. Introductory course to the major and minor.
Attributes:A&SSD, THA&S IQHUM, LCD, SDArchHUMArtHUMBUISENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L22 1550  L23 1550Frequency:Every 1 or 2 Years / History

L75 JINE 3082From the Temple to the Talmud: The Emergence of Rabbinic Judaism3.0 Units

L75 JINE 3230Jews & Christians in the Premodern World3.0 Units
Description:In modern times, it is common to think of Judaism and Christianity as two distinct, if historically connected, "religions." Increasingly, however, historians of ancient religions have thought more deeply about the implications of taking Christianity and Judaism in antiquity as more fluid and porous than we tend to think of them. In this upper division course, we will explore the ways in which the boundaries that early Christians attempted to draw between Christianity and Judaism remained unstable and incomplete. While the various efforts to establish early Christian identity led to the production of a variety of hermeneutical representations of the Judaioi, these literary representations nevertheless often reflected, to various degrees, engagement with actual historical Jews/Judeans, who shared political, economic, and intellectual worlds with Christians. We will consider how early Christian discourse about Jews and Judaism informed and was informed by intra-Christian disputes and their negotiations of their relationships with the wider Greco-Roman culture. We will explore how Christian efforts to establish both continuity and difference between Judaism played a role in the construction of 'orthodoxy' and 'heresy,' as well as the way in which Christians re-appropriated Jewish texts, rituals, and ideas in their efforts to construct a Christian identity. We will also explore how this continued dynamic of difference and continuity continued into the Middle Ages.
Attributes:A&S IQHUM, LCDBUETHENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L23 323  L08 3231Frequency:Unpredictable / History

L75 JINE 331Topics in Holocaust Studies: Children in the Shadow of the Swastika3.0 Units
Description:This course will approach the history, culture and literature of Nazism, World War II and the Holocaust by focusing on one particular aspect of the period-the experience of children. Children as a whole were drastically affected by the policies of the Nazi regime and the war it conducted in Europe, yet different groups of children experienced the period in radically different ways, depending on who they were and where they lived. By reading key texts written for and about children, we will first take a look at how the Nazis made children-both those they considered "Aryan" and those they designated "enemies" of the German people, such as Jewish children-an important focus of their politics. We will then examine literary texts and films that depict different aspects of the experience of European children during this period: daily life in the Nazi state, the trials of war and bombardment in Germany and the experience of expulsion from the East and defeat, the increasingly restrictive sphere in which Jewish children were allowed to live, the particular difficulties children faced in the Holocaust, and the experience of children in the immediate postwar period. Readings include texts by Ruth Klüger, Harry Mulisch, Imre Kertész, Miriam Katin, David Grossman and others. Course conducted entirely in English. OPEN TO FRESHMEN. STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN BOTH MAIN SECTION AND ONE DISCUSSION SECTION.
Attributes:A&STHA&S IQHUM, LCDArtHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L21 331  L16 331A  L66 331  L75 531  L79 3318  L97 3318Frequency:Every 1 or 2 Years / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----12:00P-1:00PWilson / 214 McGlothlinMay 10 2017 10:30AM - 12:30PM75490
Desc:Discussion section registration is required for this course.
Actions:Books
A----F--9:00A-10:00ACupples II / L011 Gundogan IbrisimNo Final1750
Actions:Books
B----F--12:00P-1:00PCupples II / L007 SelimovicNo Final20170
Actions:Books
C----F--1:00P-2:00PCupples II / L007 SelimovicNo Final18100
Actions:Books
D----F--12:00P-1:00PCupples II / L009 Gundogan IbrisimNo Final20170
Actions:Books

L75 JINE 335CBecoming "Modern": Emancipation, Antisemitism, and Nationalism in Modern Jewish History3.0 Units

L75 JINE 366The Sephardic Experience: 1492 to the Present3.0 Units
Description:This course explores the history and culture of the Sephardic diaspora from the expulsion of Spanish and Portuguese Jewry at the end of the fifteenth century to the present. We will start with a brief introduction into the history of Iberian Jews prior to 1492, asking how this experience created a distinct subethnic Jewish group: the Sephardim. We will then follow their migratory path to North Africa, Italy, the Ottoman Empire, the Netherlands, and the Americas. The questions we will explore include: in what sense did Jews of Iberian heritage form a transnational community? How did they use their religious, cultural, and linguistic ties to advance their commercial interests? How did they transmit and transform aspects of Spanish culture and create a vibrant Ladino literature? How did the Sephardim interact with Ashkenazi, Greek, North African, and other Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities? How did Jewish emigres from Spain and Portugal become intermediaries between Christian Europe and the Ottoman Empire? What was the role of Sephardim in Europe's transatlantic expansion? How did conversos (converts to Christianity) return to Judaism and continue to grapple with their ambiguous religious identity? How did Ottoman and North African Jews respond to European cultural trends and colonialism and create their own unique forms of modern culture? How did the Holocaust impact Sephardic Jewry? The course will end with a discussion of the Sephardic experience in America and Israel today.
Attributes:A&S IQHUM, LCDArchHUMArtHUMBUISENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CP Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L22 3856  L23 3660Frequency:Every Third Semester / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-1:00PCupples I / 207 JacobsMay 8 2017 1:00PM - 3:00PM2560
Actions:Books

L75 JINE 373Topics in Near Eastern Cultures: Of Dishes, Taste, and Class: History of Food in the Middle East3.0 Units

L75 JINE 396Islamic Philosophy, Mysticism, and Theology3.0 Units
Description:How does an individual achieve access to knowledge and access to God? To what extent is such access dependent upon scripture? To what extent is such access dependent upon reason? Are there forms of truth and experience that only reveal themselves through mysticism? Questions of this sort are central to the interrelated disciplines of Islamic philosophy, Islamic theology, and Islamic mysticism (i.e., Sufism). This course examines the preceding three disciplines, with a focus on the premodern period. Students will be introduced to major figures within these disciplines, including al-Ghazali, Ibn Sina, Ibn al-'Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Rumi. Moreover, students will also examine how these disciplines have shaped various aspects of social life within premodern Muslim communities. Although the course addresses a range of issues, special attention will be given to the following topics: (1) the relationship between Islamic scripture/law and Islamic philosophy, mysticism, and theology (2) the relationship between Islamic religious teachings and the forms of both "high" and "popular" culture found in premodern Muslim societies (3) free thought, scientific inquiry, heterodoxy, skepticism, and blasphemy in premodern Muslim societies (4) Muslim institutions and social movements dedicated to promoting philosophy, mysticism, and theology (5) the aesthetic significance of philosophical, mystical, and theological teachings, and the expression of such teachings in Islamic ritual, poetry, literature, music, dance, painting, and architecture.
Attributes:A&S IQHUM, LCDArchHUMArtHUMBUETHENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L23 396  L49 396  L75 596Frequency:Every 2-3 Years / History

L75 JINE 4357The Holocaust in the Sephardic World3.0 Units

L75 JINE 451Topics in Modern Arabic Literature and Culture: Undocumented: Arab and Afro-Arab Migrant Narratives3.0 Units
Description:Undocumented: Clandestine Narratives from the Arab, African, and Afro-Arab World This course will explore narratives of undocumented migration across the Mediterranean and the literary themes that emerge from them: criminality, legality, clandestinity, mobility, diaspora, otherness. While media attention on boat journeys across the Mediterranean has risen lately, undocumented migration from the North African coast to Fortress Europe has been on the rise since the 1990s. The course will provide some historical context surrounding each text and theme, and we will explore the meanings of historical narratives as they apply to the texts. We will consider how Mediterranean borders and border towns have been associated with visceral experience and social vices in literature: a history of travel culture attracted by freedoms and different and dangerous mores of the region. While being portrayed as diverse, encompassing many cultures and languages, social vices, pleasures, and adventure, they are also seen as sites of dangerous, illicit, and clandestine migration. We will analyze this paradox of the border alongside the identity of the undocumented who cross it in literature and other cultural texts (like graphic novels, music, and film) from Arab, Anglophone, and Francophone Africa. We will discuss the meaning ofidentity as it relates to documents and paper, with a briefforay into the identity and the movement ofthe sans-papiers in France. We will explore ideas and arguments presented in the texts and develop our own insights into the texts through close readings, writing activities, and class discussions. Feel free to integrate into discussions your own interests or experiences that relate to the course material. One objective of the course is to develop your critical thinking skills by analyzing a variety of multi- media texts (literary, filmic, musical, comic) with an eye towards context, themes, imagery, and language. This course provides a space for forming new ideas and working through questions and arguments as a means of organizing your thoughts into written compositions. Another objective is to help you develop writing skills: formulating a thesis, expressing your thoughts precisely, building convincing arguments, and using clear and correct language. Our objective is to gain the tools for writing clearly argued, well-constructed, and stylistically coherent essays. The two objectives are related: fine-tuning your literary analysis skills will improve your writing.
Attributes:A&STHA&S IQHUM, LCDArchHUMArtHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L49 451  U35 471Frequency:None / History

L75 JINE 500Independent Work in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern StudiesVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBABarmashSee Instructor000
02TBATBABergSee Instructor000
03TBATBAJacobsSee Instructor000
04TBATBAKievalSee Instructor000
05TBATBAMcGlothlinSee Instructor000
06TBATBAMcManusSee Instructor000
07TBATBANakissaSee Instructor200
Actions:Books
08TBATBAReynoldsSee Instructor010
09TBATBAYucesoySee Instructor000
10TBATBABennisSee Instructor000
11TBATBAEtzionSee Instructor000
12TBATBAPinsbergSee Instructor000
13TBATBATarbouniSee Instructor000
14TBATBAWarsiSee Instructor000
15TBATBAStaffSee Instructor000

L75 JINE 5082From the Temple to the Talmud: The Emergence of Rabbinic Judaism3.0 Units

L75 JINE 531Topics in Holocaust Studies: Children in the Shadow of the Swastika3.0 Units
Description:This course will approach the history, culture and literature of Nazism, World War II and the Holocaust by focusing on one particular aspect of the period-the experience of children. Children as a whole were drastically affected by the policies of the Nazi regime and the war it conducted in Europe, yet different groups of children experienced the period in radically different ways, depending on who they were and where they lived. By reading key texts written for and about children, we will first take a look at how the Nazis made children-both those they considered "Aryan" and those they designated "enemies" of the German people, such as Jewish children-an important focus of their politics. We will then examine literary texts and films that depict different aspects of the experience of European children during this period: daily life in the Nazi state, the trials of war and bombardment in Germany and the experience of expulsion from the East and defeat, the increasingly restrictive sphere in which Jewish children were allowed to live, the particular difficulties children faced in the Holocaust, and the experience of children in the immediate postwar period. Readings include texts by Ruth Klüger, Harry Mulisch, Imre Kertész, Miriam Katin, David Grossman and others. Course conducted entirely in English. OPEN TO FRESHMEN. STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN BOTH MAIN SECTION AND ONE DISCUSSION SECTION.
Attributes:A&STHA&S IQHUM, LCDArtHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L21 331  L16 331A  L66 331  L75 331  L79 3318  L97 3318Frequency:Every 1 or 2 Years / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----12:00P-1:00PWilson / 214 McGlothlinMay 10 2017 10:30AM - 12:30PM75490
Desc:Discussion section registration is required for this course.
Actions:Books
A----F--9:00A-10:00ACupples II / L011 Gundogan IbrisimNo Final1750
Actions: