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30 courses found.
ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (L01)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)SP2017

L01 Art-Arch 1095Freshman Seminar: Art in the Golden Age of Venice3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----10:00A-11:30AKemper / 211 GabelMay 8 2017 10:30AM - 12:30PM1520
Actions:Books

L01 Art-Arch 119Freshman Seminar: From Hercules to Harry Potter: Picturing Heroes in Ancient Greece, Rome, & Beyond3.0 Units
Description:Societal celebration of influential people, mythical or real, raises them above others in public esteem and endows them with a high degree of fame, honor, and symbolic significance. Such heroic figures are often elevated and admired not only for their individual accomplishments, but also for the moral and ethical values and virtues that they embody as examples to others. Yet, the functions of heroes (and anti-heroes) may be controversial and their meanings contested. An exploration of the role of images and other forms of visual culture in the conception of heroism, and by extension virtue (character traits that are in some deep or fundamental way connected with being a morally good or admirable person), will present the opportunity to examine, among others, the following questions: What is the role of the visual arts in establishing and sustaining heroic status through which societies define and articulate their values? How do images shape an understanding of heroic significance? What are some of the religious and political uses of heroic images? What is the relationship between the historical person (if there is one) and the imaginative construction of the hero, or put another way, the relationship between history and memory? How do images of heroes shape the narratives of communal identity of which they are a part? Together we will first explore objects and texts from ancient Greece and Rome that address these questions from a variety of thematic and methodological perspectives. We will then examine the survival and transformation of ancient conceptions of the hero in representations of America's founding fathers, American frontiersmen, comic book superheroes, and the characters of the Harry Potter Series.
Attributes:A&S IQHUM, LCDArtAHBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:30AKemper / 211 BlevinsMay 9 2017 6:00PM - 8:00PM15130
Actions:Books

L01 Art-Arch 148Imagining the Pacific: from Captain Cook to Disney's Moana3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:30PKemper / 211 O'BrienMay 9 2017 1:00PM - 3:00PM15110
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L01 Art-Arch 215Introduction to Modern Art, Architecture and Design3.0 UnitsLab Required
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-1:00PSteinberg / 105 SherenMay 8 2017 1:00PM - 3:00PM2951650
A-T-----4:00P-5:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department16130
B-T-----5:00P-6:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15150
C--W----10:00A-11:00AKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15150
D--W----11:00A-12:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15120
E--W----12:00P-1:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15140
F--W----12:00P-1:00PKemper / 211 SherenSee Department15120
G--W----5:30P-6:30PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15140
H--W----5:30P-6:30PKemper / 211 SherenSee Department1590
I---R---4:00P-5:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department16160
J---R---5:00P-6:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15150
K----F--10:00A-11:00AKemper / 103 SherenSee Department16150
L----F--12:00P-1:00PKemper / 103 SherenSee Department15150

L01 Art-Arch 4000Topics in Art History and Archaeology: Rethinking Matisse3.0 Units
Description:L01.4000, Rethinking Matisse, will be the designated Travel Seminar in the Department of Art History and Archaeology in Spring 2017. Read below for details. An intensive study of work in all media by this influential modern artist. Henri Matisse (1869-1954) is best known for his painting and sculpture, the traditional media of the French beaux-arts, often overshadowing significant work in book design, tapestry, ceramic murals, stained glass and even architecture and fashion design. To reconsider Matisse's place in the history of art in the 20th century, we will place special emphasis on the artist's contribution to modern trends in domestic and institutional decoration. His long career spanned the political schisms of the Dreyfus era in the 1890s to the efforts by France in the 1950s to recover its position in culture and politics after the Second World War, and we will also consider his relationship to the momentous political, and economic changes in his time. Related topics to be addressed: the role of his writings within comtemporary artistic discourse; the critical reception of Matisse's art in his lifetime; the historiography of modern art and his changing place in it; the market for avant-garde art in 20th century; Matisse's relationship to other artists, such as the Fauves, Picasso and other Cubists, and the conservative artists of the "return to order" in the 1920s. Prereqs: L01 113 or L01 215; one 300-level course in Art History preferred; or permission of instructor. From March 10-13, the class will make a trip to the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Barnes Foundation, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, NJ, for the special exhibition Matisse and American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, including an appointment in MoMA's Drawings and Prints Study Center. In four days we will see the three most important collections of Matisse's work in the US, plus an unprecedented exhibition that will not travel elsewhere. The Department of Art History and Archaeology will pay for all intercity transportation with the group, hotels (double rooms), museum admission fees, and some meals with the group. Each student will be responsible for most of their meals. We will leave St. Louis for Baltimore the morning of Friday, March 10 and return to St. Louis from New York the evening of Monday, March 13. We'll stay in Philadelphia two nights and New York City one night. So our trip will take place over the first few days and nights of Spring Break. The trip is a course requirement. Since the research paper requirement will involve artworks that we will see, it is imperative that everyone in the class visit these collections. Please contact the instructor, Professor John Klein, at jrklein@wustl.edu to express your interest and to make an appointment to discuss the course.
Attributes:A&STHA&S IQHUMArtAHArt-ArchMEAENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
07-T-----2:30P-5:30PKemper / 211 KleinMay 10 2017 6:00PM - 8:00PM1070
Actions:Books

L01 Art-Arch 4045Beyond Painting: Innovation in Prints and Sculpture in Early Modern Europe3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-----1:00P-4:00PSee Instructor / NONE Mann, WyckoffMay 9 2017 1:00PM - 3:00PM1580
Actions:Books

L01 Art-Arch 4817Paris ca. 1900: Art, Leisure and Spectacle3.0 Units
Description:Paris at the turn of the twentieth century was a vibrant international center for the development of the visual arts, including painting, photography, film, and the graphic arts, particularly in the exploding domains of posters and illustrated journals. In this seminar, we study the period 1880 to 1910, and examine how diverse modes of urban visuality were at the heart of the development of French modern art. The place of graphic arts in promoting popular entertainments such as ballet, opera, and café concerts, is considered. Another focus is the powerful role of Parisian satirical journals and caricature in debating matters of class, race and national identity. We examine diverse modes of displaying and selling the visual arts, particularly in the spheres of World's Fairs, annual salons, and in the avant-garde spaces of gallery and café exhibitions. Artists of central concern include Lautrec, Cheret, Mucha, Degas, Pissarro, the Nabis, Vallotton, and early filmmakers such as the Lumière brothers and Méliès. Special focus will be given to works on view in an exhibition on the subject to be held at The Kemper Art Museum in spring 2017. Pre-requisites: L01 215 or permission of instructor; one 300-level course in modern art history, or a course in modern French history or literature preferred. French language reading skills not required.
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArt-ArchMEAENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----2:30P-5:30PKemper / 211 ChildsMay 4 2017 6:00PM - 8:00PM990
Actions:Books

L01 Art-Arch 4900Independent Study and ResearchVar. Units (max = 3.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBA[TBA]No Final5000
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02TBATBAChildsNo Final5000
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03TBATBAKleutghenNo Final5000
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05TBATBASherenNo Final5000
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06TBATBAJonesNo Final5000
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07TBATBAKleinNo Final5000
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08TBATBAMillerNo Final5000
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11TBATBAO'BrienSee Instructor5010
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12TBATBAWallaceNo Final5000
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L01 Art-Arch 499Honors Art HIstory and Archaeology3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBA[TBA]See Department2000
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02TBATBAChildsSee Department2000
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03TBATBAKleutghenSee Department2000
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05TBATBASherenSee Department2010
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06TBATBAJonesSee Department2000
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07TBATBAKleinSee Department2000
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08TBATBAMillerSee Department1200
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12TBATBAWallaceSee Department1200
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L01 Art-Arch 500Independent StudyVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBASee Dept / [TBA]See Department99900
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02TBASee Dept / ChildsSee Department99900
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03TBASee Dept / KleutghenSee Department99900
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05TBASee Dept / SherenSee Department99900
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06TBASee Dept / JonesSee Department99900
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07TBASee Dept / KleinSee Department99900
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12TBASee Dept / WallaceSee Department99900
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14TBASee Dept / MumfordSee Department99900
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L01 Art-Arch 585Master's Examination PreparationVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBA[TBA]See Department99900
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02TBATBAChildsSee Department99900
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03TBATBAKleutghenSee Department99900
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05TBATBASherenSee Department99900
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06TBATBAJonesSee Department99900
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07TBATBAKleinSee Department99900
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08TBATBAMillerSee Department99900
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12TBATBAWallaceSee Department99900
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Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.